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Offline AvatarofTruth

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Reply #45 on: August 20, 2008, 08:04:49 PM
You Are What You Eat

the Washington post's review of The Omnivore's Dilemma:

Quote
Most of us are at a great distance from our food. I don't mean that we live "twelve miles from a lemon," as English wit Sydney Smith said about a home in Yorkshire. I mean that our food bears little resemblance to its natural substance. Hamburger never mooed; spaghetti grows on the pasta tree; baby carrots come from a pink and blue nursery. Still, we worry about our meals -- from calories to carbs, from heart-healthy to brain food. And we prefer our food to be "natural," as long as natural doesn't involve real.

In The Omnivore's Dilemma , Michael Pollan writes about how our food is grown -- what it is, in fact, that we are eating. The book is really three in one: The first section discusses industrial farming; the second, organic food, both as big business and on a relatively small farm; and the third, what it is like to hunt and gather food for oneself. And each section culminates in a meal -- a cheeseburger and fries from McDonald's; roast chicken, vegetables and a salad from Whole Foods; and grilled chicken, corn and a chocolate soufflé (made with fresh eggs) from a sustainable farm; and, finally, mushrooms and pork, foraged from the wild.

The first section is a wake-up call for anyone who has ever been hungry. In the United States, Pollan makes clear, we're mostly fed by two things: corn and oil. We may not sit down to bowls of yummy petroleum, but almost everything we eat has used enormous amounts of fossil fuels to get to our tables. Oil products are part of the fertilizers that feed plants, the pesticides that keep insects away from them, the fuels used by the trains and trucks that transport them across the country, and the packaging in which they're wrapped. We're addicted to oil, and we really like to eat.

Oil underlines Pollan's story about agribusiness, but corn is its focus. American cattle fatten on corn. Corn also feeds poultry, pigs and sheep, even farmed fish. But that's just the beginning. In addition to dairy products from corn-fed cows and eggs from corn-fed chickens, corn starch, corn oil and corn syrup make up key ingredients in prepared foods. High-fructose corn syrup sweetens everything from juice to toothpaste. Even the alcohol in beer is corn-based. Corn is in everything from frozen yogurt to ketchup, from mayonnaise and mustard to hot dogs and bologna, from salad dressings to vitamin pills. "Tell me what you eat," said the French gastronomist Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, "and I will tell you what you are." We're corn.

Each bushel of industrial corn grown, Pollan notes, uses the equivalent of up to a third of a gallon of oil. Some of the oil products evaporate and acidify rain; some seep into the water table; some wash into rivers, affecting drinking water and poisoning marine ecosystems. The industrial logic also means vast farms that grow only corn. When the price of corn drops, the solution, the farmer hopes, is to plant more corn for next year. The paradoxical result? While farmers earn less, there's an over-supply of cheap corn, and that means finding ever more ways to use it up.

Is eating all this corn good for us? Who knows? We think we've tamed nature, but we're just beginning to learn about all that we don't yet know. Ships were once provided with plenty of food, but sailors got scurvy because they needed vitamin C. We're sailing on the same sea, thinking we're eating well but still discovering nutrients in our food that we hadn't known were there -- that we don't yet know we need.

We've lost touch with the natural loops of farming, in which livestock and crops are connected in mutually beneficial circles. Pollan discusses the alternatives to industrial farming, but these two long (and occasionally self-indulgent) sections lack the focus and intensity -- the anger beneath the surface -- of the first. He spends a week at Joel Salatin's Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley, a farm that works with nature, rather than despite it. Salatin calls himself a grass farmer, though his farm produces cows, chickens, eggs and corn. But everything begins with the grass: The cows nibble at it at the precise moment when it's at its sweetest and are moved from pasture to pasture to keep the grass at its best height. Their droppings fertilize the grass, and the cycle is under way. There's a kind of lyrical symmetry to everything that happens on this farm. Even the final slaughtering of chickens is done quickly and humanely, in the open air. It isn't pleasant, but compared to the way cattle are fattened and slaughtered in meat industry feedlots and slaughterhouses, it is remarkably reasonable.

We needn't learn how to shoot our own pigs, as Pollan does; there's hope in other ways -- farmers' markets, the Slow Food movement, restaurants supplied by local farms. To Pollan, the omnivore's dilemma is twofold: what we choose to eat ("What should we have for dinner?" he asks in the opening sentence of his book) and how we let that food be produced. His book is an eater's manifesto, and he touches on a vast array of subjects, from food fads and taboos to our avoidance of not only our food's animality, but also our own. Along the way, he is alert to his own emotions and thoughts, to see how they affect what he does and what he eats, to learn more and to explain what he knows. His approach is steeped in honesty and self-awareness. His cause is just, his thinking is clear, and his writing is compelling.

Be careful of your dinner!


Gia, great point with the corn post, but FYI- corn is a grass, although i'm sure that's not what OP meant.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2008, 08:11:39 PM by AvatarofTruth »



Offline DeeDee18

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Reply #46 on: August 20, 2008, 08:12:21 PM
Actually not so rare up here, yum, but further south the feed lots appear and there is no more open range like we have. You still have to watch your step in the woods around my home or you may step in something warm and green and squishy up between your toes that makes you want to urp, giggle.

I read all the stuff on food but no mention is made about cumnMs, wonder why they left it out?



Offline Poppet

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Reply #47 on: August 21, 2008, 01:30:02 PM
great post. Gia and Aot - I wasn't really making a point so much as a cheap joke at the expense of veggies. I'm aware of the whole corn thing and love sodas sweetened with real sugar when I go to Europe (not very often). As for diet in general, I'ma proponent of the idea that we evolved to have a diet that was essentially low in carbs, because we didn't cultivate anything (so, no corn, no potatoes, no wheat, bread, buns, pasta... no peas or beans... etc etc. SO I think that I diet low in carbs. (seriously low) is better and that fat - including saturated animal fat, isn't a bad thing. The real problem with us in general is thatwe have a diet that REQUIRES us to have serum insulin levels that are way too high and that we don't exercise enough.

BUT - each to her own - every diet should include at least one raw kitten a day!! wink, joke, pussy eating etc!!)

have a good one, girls

xx
G

)ps who is OP)?

x
P

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Offline HizzSister

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Reply #48 on: April 12, 2009, 06:15:10 PM


If you're not familiar with "dump cakes",
you basically dump all the ingredients together and bake it.
Remember ~ use the cake mix dry.

PREP TIME  5 Min 
COOK TIME  1 Hr 
Original recipe yield 1 - 9x13 inch pan 

INGREDIENTS
1 (29 ounce) can sliced peaches, drained, juice reserved
1 (6 ounce) package peach flavored gelatin mix
1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup water

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
Place peaches in bottom of 9x13 cake pan.
Sprinkle dry peach gelatin over peaches.
Sprinkle dry cake mix over gelatin.
Cut up butter and distribute over cake mix.
Pour 1 cup of reserved peach juice and 1/2 cup of water over the top.

Bake in the preheated oven for 60 minutes, or until the top is browned.





Tie me down and fill me up.


Offline writerz01

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Reply #49 on: April 12, 2009, 07:51:42 PM
 That looks and sounds very good. Have to try this. Thank you much, HizzSister. :D

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Offline stefanwolf

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Reply #50 on: April 18, 2009, 06:37:27 AM
believe it or not this a a favorite scout campout desert, all dumped into a dutchoven.  but thanks for reminding me how easy it is sis.  *digs around in pantry for above ingredients

   "If I lick the Henna off the small of a back;   Will it dye my tongue? And if I swallow it down; Will it tattoo my heart?"


Offline HizzSister

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Reply #51 on: April 23, 2009, 08:36:29 PM
My sister-in-law made this last weekend and my brother said it was fantastic !

Tie me down and fill me up.


Offline AvatarofTruth

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Reply #52 on: April 17, 2010, 03:40:34 AM
So it's getting on to summer, or at least it is if you don't live in Anchorage, Alaska, where it snowed yesterday.

Summertime for most of us means busting out the board shorts (or bikinis), the flip flops, the sun glasses, and the mai tais. It also means the backyard barbecue.

Store bought burgers are thin, flat, and flash frozen with liquid nitrogen. They are usually less than tasty. But if you buy ground beef and make your own patties, they fall apart on the grill! It seems the only remedy is to throw in an egg or two, and add crackers, but who wants to eat the 'meatloaf' burger? Really, I'd like to meet this person.

So here's my summertime burger recipe:

Ryan's Recession-Proof Burgers:

Mix together:

1/4 cup of your favorite BBQ sauce
1/8 cup of worcester sauce
1tbs Montreal steak seasoning
1tbs Frank's Red Hot sauce

Mix this up into a dish you can carry around, and when you throw burgers on the grill, right when they star to warm up, brush this on them. When they're done cooking, put the burger together however you like it: lettuce, tomato, onions, etc. Points for awesome if you throw blue cheese or goat cheese on top. Serve with Murphy's Stout, or other acceptable dark brew (Black Butte porter, for example).

Anyone else have some barbecue suggestions?


Offline Dark Indigo Enigma

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Reply #53 on: April 19, 2010, 10:59:22 AM
Sounds tasty. I think I will be trying it next chance I get.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2010, 11:00:53 AM by Dark Indigo Enigma »



Offline Grm

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Reply #54 on: January 18, 2011, 10:34:33 AM
time to add your recipes to an old thread



Offline fourstrokes

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Reply #55 on: January 18, 2011, 12:39:49 PM
As many here my favourite breakfast is whoever wakes up by my side in bed.

Lacking that ingredient I eat almost anything for breakfast:

Coffee or tea, now I am in a coffee phase, yogurt, fruit (normally an apple but any would do).... That's the norm but sometimes I have a cheese sandwich or muesli and corn flakes as today...



Offline licksnkissez

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Reply #56 on: January 18, 2011, 04:10:55 PM
I've been eating low carb for a year and a half now. Thirty pounds lighter it's become a way of life for me. Fast food is a thing of the past (except for the rare hot wing from KFC). The only think I really REALLY missed was pizza. I found a recipie for pizza crust made from shredded cauliflower and it's awesome. Not 'real' pizza..actually it's better. Here's a photo and the link for the recipie follows.  :emot_kiss:



http://www.examiner.com/low-carb-in-national/cauliflower-pizza-crust-worth-its-wow-gold

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Offline fourstrokes

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Reply #57 on: January 18, 2011, 05:45:39 PM
hey that recipe looks good and easy to make... I will make it this weekend!!!!



Offline watcher1

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Reply #58 on: January 18, 2011, 06:16:17 PM
I've been eating low carb for a year and a half now.

The Eagle is low carb.   ;D ;D

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Offline licksnkissez

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Reply #59 on: January 18, 2011, 07:11:39 PM
High protein, eh Eagle? Oh and just a little tip for anyone that makes that pizza: I always double the recipie and bake it on parchment paper! :emot_kiss:

Keep company only with people who uplift you, whose presence calls forth your best.
- Epictetus