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Author Topic: Food Porn! and favorite foods.  (Read 30707 times)
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Jed_
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« Reply #375 on: May 22, 2020, 03:20:01 PM »

Toe, I recommend a new cookbook out on Cajun food:

http://www.mosquitosupperclub.com/cookbook

I’m reading it now and learning a lot.  For me gumbo had 3-4 essential ingredients, a meat and or meats including seafood, a dark roux of flour cooked in fat, okra, and maybe gumbo filé.

The roux, okra and filé are thickening agents.  The roux from the French, the okra from the Africans and the ground sassafras leaves (filé) from Native Americans.

I sort of knew not all gumbos had all three thickening agents based on looking at some recipes in the three Emeril cookbooks I have, but was resistant to the idea, particularly on the thought of omitting okra.  But it makes sense, that culture would not have okra available all the time, as it’s seasonal.  In fact, okra while a somewhat frequent ingredient, is not in many recipes.  And when it’s present, it’s highlighted in the recipe title (e.g. Shrimp and Okra Gumbo).  Okra is available frozen, pickled and canned, but we’re talking about a culture that mostly used what was available fresh.

I couldn’t find sassafras filé, so I just ordered online along with dried shrimp, another very Cajun ingredient.

Today is cold and rainy, perfect for a soup.  But going to wait for my filé to arrive before I do another gumbo, probably next week.  Today I’m making my grandmother’s vegetable soup.  It has beef in it, but she just called it vegetable soup.

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« Reply #376 on: May 22, 2020, 03:41:48 PM »

Hope you ordered Zatarain’s. It is the best.



Historical recipes are interesting, but let’s face it.  150 years ago you had little in the larder in the way of staples and seasonings.  Wars were fought over spices, and only the wealthy had much more than salt.
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« Reply #377 on: May 22, 2020, 05:31:43 PM »

Zatarain’s was an option on Amazon, but I went for River Road only because it sounded small business.  I actually don’t know how big these companies are.
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MissBarbara
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« Reply #378 on: May 22, 2020, 08:12:52 PM »


Historical recipes are interesting, but let’s face it.  150 years ago you had little in the larder in the way of staples and seasonings.  Wars were fought over spices, and only the wealthy had much more than salt.


Oh no! It's yet another MissBarbara historical derailment!

Yes, a long series of small wars -- known as the Spice Wars -- were fought over a period of about 70 years in the 17th century over control of areas that produced "exotic" spices. Chiefly involving the Dutch, Portuguese, and, in a more minor role, the British, these conflicts took place across the globe, from Brazil and the West Indies, to Africa, and in many parts of Asia. These exotic spices are, today, very common and very cheap, like cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper, mace, and cloves, but at the time, they were worth many times more than gold.

But prior two that, there were two landmark events in world history that were directly impelled by the quest for these spices.

Everyone knows the story of Christopher Columbus, how he convinced the king and queen of Spain to finance a voyage across the ocean, and reach the east by sailing west. And during his voyage he "discovered" the "new world," etc., etc. But what gets lost in the story is that Columbus's greatest goal wasn't gold, but spices. And he was sailing west to the east in search of the "spice islands" (which are in modern-day Indonesia), to obtain the spices and win him and his royal sponsors untold riches. Of course, Columbus was off by about 12,000 miles, but that's a story for another day.

Fast forward about 150 years, and the Dutch, in their colonizing quest to expand their empire across the world, established a tiny colony on an island in the Atlantic Ocean. It was an ideal place, relatively uninhabited, teeing with natural resources, and surrounded by a perfect natural harbor. Meanwhile, at that same moment, the Dutch and British began fighting over another tiny island, this one in the Indian Ocean, known today as Run Island in the Moluccas chain. This island was, at the time, the world's only source of the spice nutmeg. Not only was nutmeg a treasured spice for seasoning foods, it also had several medicinal properties, some real, others imaginary. The conflict over Run Island was ultimately resolved the conflict by agreeing to a swap: The Dutch would get Run Island, and the British would get that tiny island in the Atlantic on the other side of the world. And so, on September 8th, 1664, the last Dutch official departed that little island and the tiny colony they had established there, and handed it over to the British.

Today that island is known as "New York City.






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« Reply #379 on: May 22, 2020, 08:16:24 PM »


Previously known as New Amsterdam, I believe.

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« Reply #380 on: May 22, 2020, 10:17:57 PM »


Previously known as New Amsterdam, I believe.


Exactly.

And it's the reason we speak English, and not Dutch, today.

Well, kind of.

But I'm a fan of Ajax, so there's that...



« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 11:35:57 PM by MissBarbara » Logged


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« Reply #381 on: May 22, 2020, 10:59:40 PM »

Even old New York, was once New Amsterdam...

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/xo0X77OBJUg&rel=1" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/v/xo0X77OBJUg&rel=1</a>
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« Reply #382 on: May 23, 2020, 06:20:31 PM »


Previously known as New Amsterdam, I believe.


Exactly.

And it's the reason we speak English, and not Dutch, today.

Well, kind of.

But I'm a fan of Ajax, so there's that...



My favourite Dutch team as well, especially as I remember their heyday.  They had to be reduced to 9 men so that my favourite UK team could get a draw against them recently.

Can I hear someone shout derail? Grin

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« Reply #383 on: May 23, 2020, 11:13:29 PM »

Hope you ordered Zatarain’s. It is the best.



Historical recipes are interesting, but let’s face it.  150 years ago you had little in the larder in the way of staples and seasonings.  Wars were fought over spices, and only the wealthy had much more than salt.


Turns out my grocery store has it, hidden up high and way to the left of the other spices.  I bought Zatarain’s crab boil seasoning and a few other Cajun/Creole seasonings they had from Louisiana.

Thread back on track.
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« Reply #384 on: May 23, 2020, 11:19:14 PM »


Previously known as New Amsterdam, I believe.


Exactly.

And it's the reason we speak English, and not Dutch, today.

Well, kind of.

But I'm a fan of Ajax, so there's that...



My favourite Dutch team as well, especially as I remember their heyday.  They had to be reduced to 9 men so that my favourite UK team could get a draw against them recently.

Can I hear someone shout derail? Grin


And Arjen Robben was one of my favorite players of all time. During this shut-in I've been streaming "older" matches, and one of them I watched was the 2013 Champions League final, where Robben scored the winning goal in the 89th minute.





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« Reply #385 on: May 23, 2020, 11:26:11 PM »

I ordered 4 more books on Southern and Soulfood cooking.
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« Reply #386 on: May 26, 2020, 09:35:52 AM »




Memorial Day dinner:

Ribs On the smoker
Mini crabcakes
Spanakopita (Greek spinach pie)
Sweet potato
Cabbage with peppers and peanut butter (recipe from the Congo)
BBQ baked beans
Oregon Pinot noir
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« Reply #387 on: June 01, 2020, 06:53:56 AM »

Hope you ordered Zatarain’s. It is the best.



Historical recipes are interesting, but let’s face it.  150 years ago you had little in the larder in the way of staples and seasonings.  Wars were fought over spices, and only the wealthy had much more than salt.


My filé finally arrived, so it’s gumbo for dinner tomorrow.  On Saturday I bought some head on shrimp and frozen cleaned crabs at an international market.  I also have some andouille sausage and smoked turkey leg pieces to add.

Sunday’s dinner was ceviche, a weekend favorite.  I also had some Korean vegetables from the international market, kimchi and the like.  My Peruvian passed on the kimchi.

I need to go to these international markets more often.  The selections are amazing.  I bought two fish we had for dinner Saturday.  My Peruvian loved both the Spanish mackerel and the black sea bass, two fish I’ve caught tons of.  The seafood markets nearby have such limited selection, and never head on fish, just filets.  You need to see the head, are the gills bright color? are the eyes clear? it’s how you know it’s fresh.  The international market focuses on Asian food, so many fish are Pacific varieties, but there’s local Atlantic stuff too that I gravitate to.

Our ceviche always includes sweet potatoes, this time two Korean varieties, one yellow and one purple.  They were good, but I agree the Latin yellow and purple varieties we get are better.  South America is the potato SOURCE.

We also stocked up on Peruvian food.  So many of our Peruvian staples had gotten depleted.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2020, 07:27:57 AM by Jed_ » Logged
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