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Author Topic: Msslave’s Bird Pictures  (Read 1605 times)
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watcher1
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« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2015, 03:48:19 PM »


*Congrats* watcher..... LOL

But aren't the moderators going to have to edit due to references to young chicks?
(Oh, brody!  Bad brody!)

LOL -young chicks to me are those in their 40s.  Grin

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« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2015, 09:04:49 PM »


http://dcist.com/2015/03/the_eaglets_have_landed_at_national.php
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« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2015, 11:27:36 PM »

Eagles in DC.....
I think that's great, I hope they get the protection that they deserve.

Love,
Liz
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« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2015, 02:37:19 PM »


lol, joan caught me now in DC.  Darn, hard to get around nowadays without being caught on camera.  WOO though for the great photo.
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« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2015, 04:33:30 PM »


lol, joan caught me now in DC.  Darn, hard to get around nowadays without being caught on camera.  WOO though for the great photo.

Mom needs to get that eaglet back away from the edge of the next.  A couple years ago, we had a little one take a header out of the nest.  No, sadly, he didn't make it.  The other eaglet in the nest got his wing caught and was taken to the Raptor Center in St. Paul.  Had to get him back within 48 hours, or the parents wouldn't take him back.  He was patched up and returned just in time.  It wasn't until the next morning that the parents returned.  Hundreds of us were watching on line pulling for the little guy.

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« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2019, 03:32:32 PM »

Yesterday we said farewell to three of the four Robin chicks that were hatched in a nest under our eaves.  One by one they stood on the edge of the nest building up their courage to make the leap.  When ready, whoooosh, off they each went, flying to the neighbors yard which is filled with plants and bushes, where they'll be safe as the perfect their flying skills and grow some more.  The fourth must be a "late hatch", as it's much smaller and will have the nest to itself now and get all the food. 



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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2019, 04:21:56 PM »

Yesterday we said farewell to three of the four Robin chicks that were hatched in a nest under our eaves.  One by one they stood on the edge of the nest building up their courage to make the leap.  When ready, whoooosh, off they each went, flying to the neighbors yard which is filled with plants and bushes, where they'll be safe as the perfect their flying skills and grow some more.  The fourth must be a "late hatch", as it's much smaller and will have the nest to itself now and get all the food. 





Fun.

Thank you for sharing.  Smiley
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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2019, 05:17:50 PM »

Beautiful photography.  Thanks.
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« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2019, 03:21:10 PM »

As always, msslave, great photos.  Yesterday, I saw literally dozens of fuzzy baby geese walking, or waddling, all around the golf course. With all the rain we have been having, there are ponds everywhere for them to frolic in.
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« Reply #24 on: June 11, 2019, 08:16:12 PM »

My first thought, when I saw those photos, was "they aren't robins!"

Then I remembered - the colonists tended to lack imagination when naming newly-encountered species.

(I see a Turdus thrush of some sort in those pictures, rather than the perky little Robin Redbreast.)
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« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2019, 08:55:45 PM »

My first thought, when I saw those photos, was "they aren't robins!"

Then I remembered - the colonists tended to lack imagination when naming newly-encountered species.

(I see a Turdus thrush of some sort in those pictures, rather than the perky little Robin Redbreast.)

The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the true thrush genus and Turdidae, the wider thrush family. It is named after the European robin, because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the Old World flycatcher family.
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« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2019, 09:16:36 PM »

At least they didn't make a cardinal eror?
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« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2019, 09:32:34 PM »

At least they didn't make a cardinal eror?

I googled “robin’s red breasts.”

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psiberzerker
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« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2019, 10:04:54 PM »

Pretty sure that's a woodpecker.   emot_laughing

Also, nipples on a bird?
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« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2019, 10:26:35 PM »

My first thought, when I saw those photos, was "they aren't robins!"

Then I remembered - the colonists tended to lack imagination when naming newly-encountered species.

(I see a Turdus thrush of some sort in those pictures, rather than the perky little Robin Redbreast.)

The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the true thrush genus and Turdidae, the wider thrush family. It is named after the European robin, because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the Old World flycatcher family.

I did know that...

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