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Author Topic: The Trump thread: All things Donald  (Read 126051 times)
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Athos_131
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« Reply #5760 on: August 12, 2019, 11:54:44 PM »

U.S. Significantly Weakens Endangered Species Act

Quote
The Trump administration on Monday announced that it would change the way the Endangered Species Act is applied, significantly weakening the nation’s bedrock conservation law credited with rescuing the bald eagle, the grizzly bear and the American alligator from extinction.

The changes will make it harder to consider the effects of climate change on wildlife when deciding whether a given species warrants protection. They would most likely shrink critical habitats and, for the first time, would allow economic assessments to be conducted when making determinations.

The rules also make it easier to remove a species from the endangered species list and weaken protections for threatened species, a designation that means they are at risk of becoming endangered.

Overall, the new rules would very likely clear the way for new mining, oil and gas drilling, and development in areas where protected species live.

Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said the changes would modernize the Endangered Species Act and increase transparency in its application. “The act’s effectiveness rests on clear, consistent and efficient implementation,” he said in a statement Monday.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement the revisions “fit squarely within the president’s mandate of easing the regulatory burden on the American public, without sacrificing our species’ protection and recovery goals.”

The new rules are expected to appear in the Federal Register this week and will go into effect 30 days after that.

Environmental organizations denounced the changes as a disaster for imperiled wildlife.

David J. Hayes, who served as a deputy interior secretary in the Obama administration and is now executive director of the State Energy and Environmental Impact Center at the New York University School of Law, said the changes would “straitjacket the scientists to take climate change out of consideration” when determining how to best protect wildlife. “We all know that climate change is now the greatest threat ever to hundreds of species,” Mr. Hayes said.

A recent United Nations assessment, some environmentalists noted, has warned that human pressures are poised to drive one million species into extinction and that protecting land and biodiversity is critical to keep greenhouse gas emissions in check.
Climate change, a lack of environmental stewardship and mass industrialization have all contributed to the enormous expected global nature loss, the United Nations report said.

Ever since President Richard M. Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law in 1973, it has been the main United States legislation for protecting fish, plants and wildlife, and has acted as a safety net for species on the brink of extinction. The peregrine falcon, the humpback whale, the Tennessee purple coneflower and the Florida manatee all would very likely have disappeared without it, scientists say.

Republicans have long sought to narrow the scope of the law, saying that it burdens landowners, hampers industry and hinders economic growth. Mr. Bernhardt wrote in an op-ed last summer that the act places an “unnecessary regulatory burden” on companies.

They also make the case that the law is not reasonable because species are rarely removed from the list. Since the law was passed, more than 1,650 have been listed as threatened or endangered, while just 47 have been delisted because their populations rebounded.

Over the past two years Republicans made a major legislative push to overhaul the law. Despite holding a majority in both houses of Congress, though, the proposals were never taken up in the Senate. With Democrats now in control of the House, there is little chance of those bills passing.

The Trump administration’s revisions to the regulations that guide the implementation of the law, however, mean opponents of the Endangered Species Act are still poised to claim their biggest victory in decades.

One of the most controversial changes removes longstanding language that prohibits the consideration of economic factors when deciding whether a species should be protected.

Under the current law, such determinations must be made solely based on science, “without reference to possible economic or other impacts of determination.”

Gary Frazer, the assistant director for endangered species with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, said that phrase had been removed for reasons of “transparency.” He said the change leaves open the possibility of conducting economic analyses for informational purposes, but that decisions about listing species would still be based exclusively on science.

Environmental groups saw a danger in that. “There can be economic costs to protecting endangered species,” said Drew Caputo, vice president of litigation for lands, wildlife and oceans at Earthjustice, an environmental law organization. But, he said, “If we make decisions based on short-term economic costs, we’re going to have a whole lot more extinct species.”

The new rules also give the government significant discretion in deciding what is meant by the term “foreseeable future.” That’s a semantic change with far-reaching implications, because it enables regulators to disregard the effects of extreme heat, drought, rising sea levels and other consequences of climate change that may occur several decades from now.

When questioned about that change and its implications in the era of climate change, Mr. Frazer said the agency wanted to avoid making “speculative” decisions far into the future.

Among the animals at risk from this change, Mr. Caputo listed a few: Polar bears and seals that are losing crucial sea ice; whooping cranes whose migration patterns are shifting because of temperature changes; and beluga whales that will have to dive deeper and longer to find food in a warmer Arctic.

Jonathan Wood, a lawyer at the Pacific Legal Foundation, a conservative group that has represented landowners in opposing endangered species designations, said he believed the changes would improve the law by simplifying the regulatory process and making the law less punitive.

“It’s a shift away from conflict in favor of more collaboration and cooperation,” he said.

#Resist
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« Reply #5761 on: August 12, 2019, 11:58:49 PM »

This is how to respond to Trump’s conspiratorial lunacy

Quote
This is how CNN’s State of the Union began on Sunday:

JAKE TAPPER: Hello. I’m Jake Tapper in Washington, where the state of our union is appalled. We begin this morning with a retweet from the president of the United States, not a message about healing or uniting the country one week after two horrifying massacres, not about the victims of those tragedies.

Instead, President Trump using his massive Twitter platform, 63 million followers, to spread a deranged conspiracy theory, tying the death of pedophile Jeffrey Epstein in prison to the president's former political rivals the Clintons.

I’m not going to show you the tweet, but the spokesperson for former president Bill Clinton responded to the president retweeting it, saying — quote — “Ridiculous and, of course, not true, and Donald Trump knows it. Has he triggered the 25th Amendment yet?” . . .

President Trump has also given voice to the lie that the migrant and refugee crisis at the southern border of the U.S. is a plot by Jewish billionaire George Soros to fund a — quote — “invasion.”

That is a conspiracy theory that was the motive for mass slaughter in Pittsburgh and El Paso.

This is no longer just irresponsible and indecent. It is dangerous.

Joining me now from his hometown of El Paso, after having canceled his campaign events for the week to deal with the mourning citizens in his city, Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke. . .

What was your reaction when you saw the tweets?

BETO O’ROURKE (D), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: This is another example of our president using this position of public trust to attack his political enemies with unfounded conspiracy theories, and also to try to force you and me and all of us to focus on his bizarre behavior, instead of the fact that we just lost 22 people in this community, nine people in Dayton, Ohio; we’re seeing an epidemic of gun violence every single day in this country. . .

He’s changing the conversation. And if we allow him to do that, then we will never be able to focus on the true problems, of which he is a part, and make sure that we get to the solutions, now, whether that means legislation that keeps guns out of the hands of those who shouldn’t have it.


Credit Tapper with not allowing Trump to use his show as a megaphone for Trump’s insane conspiracy-mongering and reminding viewers that the president feeds conspiracy theories all the time, some of which are the source of inspiration or reaffirmation for violent extremists.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) appeared later in the show. When asked about Trump’s Jeffrey Epstein tweet, Booker responded, “You know, this is just more recklessness. What he’s doing is dangerous.” Booker continued: “He’s giving life to not just conspiracy theories, but really whipping people up into anger and worse against different people in this country. And so this is a tired way that the president does. He’s been using the Clintons as a means for a lot of his false accusations.” Booker reminded us that the Pizzagate conspiracy was another violence-inducing episode. “We see people’s lives being threatened because this president whips up hatred. This is a very dangerous president that we have right now, trying to divide us against each other and really using the same tactics and the same language, not just of white supremacists, but also using the same tactics and languages of the Russians, if you look at the intelligence reports about how they’re coming at our democracy.”

O’Rourke and Booker both made the key points that any responsible official should make. There is a simple formula for responding to these episodes: 1) Reaffirm that they are baseless, crazy theories; 2) Remind Americans that as president, Trump has access to the very best intelligence but instead prefers to spread dark, false conspiracy theories; 3) Trump’s microphone is the loudest in the world, and whether he intends to, his words will stir some unstable and/or evil people to act; and 4) In putting Americans at risk, he violates his oath, and if he believes in what he’s saying, he is also mentally unfit to lead.

The media can go further than these statements. For starters, when a spokesperson such as the notoriously untruthful Kellyanne Conway comes on air to say she “just wants everything to be investigated,” the host has an obligation to call her out for putting words in Trump’s mouth and to compel her (i.e., do not move on with the interview) to admit he is propagating unfounded conspiracy theories. It is also incumbent on the media to grill every Republican who comes on: Is the president doing harm? Do you denounce his actions? Is a president who does this fit to serve?

Finally, as Tapper did, media outlets have to think long and hard about repeating Trump’s conspiracies theories. They also need to consider whether it is responsible to, in essence, republish Trump’s lies and his excuses for lies by giving a platform to his apologists. It is irresponsible to turn over a readership or viewership to apologists who make blatantly false analogies (e.g., claiming Dayton’s shooting was motivated by left-wing conspiracy theories).

Media organizations are not “taking sides” when they exclude false information, information that can be dangerous to boot. This is the trap of false balance. There is no balance required when it comes to “Did the Clintons kill Epstein?” or “Did Trump actually help propagate conspiracy theories?” There are factual answers (no and yes, respectively), and a responsible media organization does not allow an apologist to suggest that we really don’t know about those Clintons. A legitimate news organization does not provide a forum for hacks to lie that the president “just wants everything to be investigated.”

In short, the story here is threefold. The president is irresponsibly fanning incendiary conspiracy theories and white nationalist tropes; his aides won’t acknowledge that, so they lie about what he’s saying; and Republicans are too cowardly to denounce him or question his mental fitness. With Trump, his media mouthpieces and social media armies spreading so much misinformation that feeds the atmosphere, the mainstream media has an outsized obligation to provide a true accounting of events. If not, they become complicit.

#Resist
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« Reply #5762 on: August 13, 2019, 12:05:14 AM »

Trump has made 12,019 false or misleading claims over 928 days


Quote
Trump’s proclivity for spouting exaggerated numbers, unwarranted boasts and outright falsehoods has continued at a remarkable pace. As of Aug. 5, his 928th day in office, he had made 12,019 false or misleading claims, according to the Fact Checker’s database that analyzes, categorizes and tracks every suspect statement the president has uttered.

Trump crossed the 10,000 mark on April 26, and he has been averaging about 20 fishy claims a day since then. From the start of his presidency, he has averaged about 13 such claims a day.

About one-fifth of these claims are about immigration, his signature issue — a percentage that has grown since the government shut down over funding for his promised wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. In fact, his most repeated claim — 190 times — is that his border wall is being built. Congress balked at funding the concrete barrier he envisioned, so he has tried to pitch bollard fencing and repairs of existing barriers as “a wall.”

False or misleading claims about trade, the economy and the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign each account for about 10 percent of the total. Claims on those subjects are also among his most repeated.

Trump has falsely claimed 186 times that the U.S. economy today is the best in history. He began making this claim in June 2018, and it quickly became one of his favorites. The president can certainly brag about the state of the economy, but he runs into trouble when he repeatedly makes a play for the history books. By just about any important measure, the economy today is not doing as well as it did under Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson or Bill Clinton — or Ulysses S. Grant. Moreover, the economy is beginning to hit the head winds caused by the president’s trade wars.

On 166 occasions, he has claimed the United States has “lost” money on trade deficits. This reflects a basic misunderstanding of economics. Countries do not “lose” money on trade deficits. A trade deficit simply means that people in one country are buying more goods from another country than people in the second country are buying from the first country. Trade deficits are also affected by macroeconomic factors, such as currencies, economic growth, and savings and investment rates.

Trump has falsely said 162 times that he passed the biggest tax cut in history. Even before his tax cut was crafted, he promised that it would be the biggest in U.S. history — bigger than Ronald Reagan’s in 1981. Reagan’s tax cut amounted to 2.9 percent of the gross domestic product, and none of the proposals under consideration came close to that level. Yet Trump persisted in this fiction even when the tax cut was eventually crafted to be the equivalent of 0.9 percent of GDP, making it the eighth-largest tax cut in 100 years. This continues to be an all-purpose applause line at the president’s rallies.

The president’s constant Twitter barrage also adds to his totals. More than 18 percent of the false and misleading statements stemmed from his itchy Twitter finger.

Trump’s penchant for repeating false claims is demonstrated by the fact that the Fact Checker database has recorded more than 300 instances in which he has repeated a variation of the same claim at least three times. He also now has earned 23 “Bottomless Pinocchios,” claims that have earned Three or Four Pinocchios and that have been repeated at least 20 times.

Even as Trump’s fact-free statements proliferate, there is evidence that his approach is failing.

Fewer than 3 in 10 Americans believe many of his most-common false statements, according to a Washington Post Fact Checker poll published in December. Only among a pool of strong Trump approvers — about 1 in 6 adults in the survey — did large majorities accept several, although not all, of his falsehoods as true.

The award-winning database website, created by graphics reporter Leslie Shapiro, has an extremely fast search engine that will quickly locate suspect statements the president has made. We encourage readers to explore it in detail. For this update, we have added a new feature that provides a URL for every claim that is fact-checked, allowing readers to post the link on social media.

#Resist
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« Reply #5763 on: August 13, 2019, 12:05:24 AM »

This shit is so indicative of the kinds of fanatics that will think the worst of the Clintons, and Obamas, and yet overlook the worst about the Trumps.

What about Ivanka's Emails?  Nothing.  Not a damned thing.

The Hairpeice in Chief has ties to Pedophile's Paradise Island?  The Clintons had him killed.

Not like Goldfinger owns any properties in Brighton Beach.
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« Reply #5764 on: August 13, 2019, 12:06:58 AM »

U.S. Budget Deficit Already Exceeds Last Year’s Total Figure


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The U.S. fiscal deficit has already exceeded the full-year figure for last year, as spending growth outpaces revenue.

The gap grew to $866.8 billion in the first 10 months of the fiscal year, up 27% from the same period a year earlier, the Treasury Department said in its monthly budget report on Monday. That’s wider than last fiscal year’s shortfall of $779 billion -- which was the largest federal deficit since 2012.

So far in the fiscal year that began Oct. 1, a revenue increase of 3% hasn’t kept pace with a 8% rise in spending. While still a modest source of income, tariffs imposed by the Trump administration helped almost double customs duties to $57 billion in the period.

Republican tax cuts, increased federal spending and an aging population have contributed to the fiscal strains, though the GOP says tax reform enacted last year will spur economic growth and lift government revenue. Corporate income-tax receipts rose 3% between October and July, while individual income taxes gained 1%, according to Treasury data.

The annual budget deficit is expected to exceed $1 trillion starting in 2022, the Congressional Budget Office has said. The non-partisan agency is scheduled to update its latest 10-year budget and economic forecasts on Aug. 21.

For the month of July, the budget deficit was $119.7 billion, compared with $76.9 billion a year earlier, according to Treasury. Still, “July 2019 was a record receipts month, and the month is generally a deficit month -- 63 of the last 65 times,” a senior Treasury official said in an accompanying statement.

#Resist
[/quote]
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« Reply #5765 on: August 13, 2019, 12:09:42 AM »

At rally, Trump seethes with elite contempt for Real Americans

Quote
The candidate for president was seething with disdain for a large swath of Real Americans. The candidate scoffed at their suffering. The candidate oozed with haughty superciliousness as he wrote off all those Americans as unworthy of concern or outreach. All the while, the candidate’s audience, cloistered in their bubble, insulated from those Americans and their travails, tittered with glee.

I’m talking about President Trump, who mocked Baltimore for its high murder rate at his reelection rally in Ohio on Thursday night. “The homicide rate in Baltimore is significantly higher than El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala,” Trump scoffed.

“Gimme a place that you think is pretty bad,” Trump said, employing audience engagement with the swagger of a stand-up comedian. Someone shouted out “Afghanistan,” and Trump ran with it.

As the Baltimore Sun put it, Trump treated the city as a “punch line.”

We will now see a throng of pundits, columnists and even neutral reporters tearing into Trump for demonstrating elitist disdain for untold numbers of Americans, for mocking their culture and way of life and for dismissing them as no longer worthy of even minimal efforts to win over, yes?

This episode brought to mind the extraordinary outrage that greeted Hillary Clinton’s remarks last year about the high economic productivity of Clinton counties. “I won the places that represent two-thirds of America’s gross domestic product,” Clinton said, describing them as “optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward.”

Trump’s rally also brought to mind the fury that rained down on Clinton when she said in 2016, “we’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

Permit me to re-litigate those episodes because they say something about a very deep imbalance that is all around us right now.

In both those cases, Clinton was pilloried far and wide for demonstrating elite contempt for her fellow Americans and their way of life. Yet in both, Clinton was referencing actual existing phenomena and proposing that they require our attention.

In the first, you might fault Clinton for being inartful. But there actually is a large economic divergence underway between big, diverse metropolitan areas that are reaping gains from digitalization and globalization, and left-behind rural and small-town communities. Clinton actually did win the economically thriving areas, and this really does have serious ramifications for our politics, exacerbating resentments and geographic polarization.

This is also a problem that has led progressive economists to propose agendas for dealing with it. That includes Clinton herself, who has also spoken to the social problems generated by this divergence.

In the second of those, it’s actually true that, if we are going to address the climate crisis, coal will have to be eased out. But Clinton spoke sympathetically to the consequences of this in the very next sentences, noting that we “don’t want to forget” coal miners. And as David Roberts notes, she had produced a sweeping plan to help manage their inevitable displacement.

The crime in Baltimore that Trump mocked is also a real phenomenon, of course. But here’s the crucial difference: Clinton actually wasn’t showing disdain for rural, non-metropolitan America — at best, she was being inartful, while proposing actual solutions to the problems she highlighted — while Trump actually is showing disdain for urban America. He is even openly flaunting it:

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1157259424794324992

Kudos to CNN’s Abby D. Phillip, who found a way to register this imbalance. “Imagine a president riffing on the opioid overdose rate in suburban or rural America to laughter from his supporters,” Phillip noted. “You probably can’t.”

The press does focus regularly on Trump’s racism. As Brian Beutler notes, the media has genuinely struggled to move past journalistic conventions that editorially constrained forthright descriptions of that racism.

But Trump’s racism is rarely discussed in terms of the contempt and loathing it shows toward millions of living, breathing Americans, or the impact it has on them.

A deep imbalance
Here’s the bottom line: Big news organizations often seem to editorially privilege the difficulties and even the feelings of Midwestern whites. I can’t cite a study that proves this. But you see it constantly.

The genre of newspaper writing that sends reporters into diners and dives down the road from rusting factories to find out what Trump voters think of whatever just happened has literally become the stuff of parody, as Alexandra Petri demonstrates well.

When Trump attacked four nonwhite congresswomen, telling the country they aren’t really part of the American nation, one news organization sent reporters out to discover what Midwestern white Trump voters thought about it. No, really.

This lopsidedness has seeped into coverage of the Democratic primaries. The candidates are proposing agendas to address structural racism and mitigate the human toll being inflicted on immigrant communities. This is constantly described as potentially alienating to Trump country — Midwestern white voters.

Whether that’s true, or a matter for Democrats to worry about, is beside the point. What’s notable is that this is often the prism through which those policy debates are viewed. One news account subtly took Democrats to task for spending “time on issues facing people of color,” which would leave “auto workers and union members” — Midwestern white voters — “disappointed.”

There is a genuine argument among Democrats over how aggressively to pursue Midwestern whites. But much of this is intra-party debating over how to build a winning coalition. It does not constitute the contemptuous writing off of those parts of the country. Indeed, some candidates have rolled out plans to address their challenges.

By contrast, Trump is not just writing off large chunks of the country as unworthy of campaign outreach. He’s writing them off as president, openly signaling to his America that he recognizes zero institutional obligation to be president of that other America. As Jonathan Chait notes, Trump has “never adopted even the pose of representing the entire country.”

Our discourse has not figured out a way to faithfully convey this deep imbalance.

#Resist
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« Reply #5766 on: August 13, 2019, 06:20:34 AM »

If the Clintons are such all powerful murderers, why isn't Trump dead yet?
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« Reply #5767 on: August 13, 2019, 08:58:45 AM »

If the Clintons are such all powerful murderers, why isn't Trump dead yet?

Need to ask Seth Rich, I think...
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« Reply #5768 on: August 13, 2019, 12:35:51 PM »

Need to ask Seth Rich, I think...

So, you don't know.  I'm sure you have some evidence in the Seth Rich case, too?
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« Reply #5769 on: August 13, 2019, 12:41:45 PM »



#Resist
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« Reply #5770 on: August 14, 2019, 06:50:22 AM »

If the Clintons are such all powerful murderers, why isn't Trump dead yet?

Need to ask Seth Rich, I think...

Actually, The Seth Rich murdered by the Clintons conspiracy theory was tracked back to the Russians.  It was first published by RT and then picked up and spread far and wide by Faux News and other right-wing-nuts.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Seth_Rich

https://thehill.com/homenews/media/452157-russias-foreign-intelligence-service-secretly-planted-fake-report-that-seth
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« Reply #5771 on: August 14, 2019, 07:14:24 AM »

Those rascally Russians again. Well, when those Russians respond, and show up for their day in court, as ordered by the Special Counsel, we will all see...
  I should have known the Clintons could not have been involved in anything.


If the Clintons are such all powerful murderers, why isn't Trump dead yet?

Need to ask Seth Rich, I think...

Actually, The Seth Rich murdered by the Clintons conspiracy theory was tracked back to the Russians.  It was first published by RT and then picked up and spread far and wide by Faux News and other right-wing-nuts.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Seth_Rich

https://thehill.com/homenews/media/452157-russias-foreign-intelligence-service-secretly-planted-fake-report-that-seth
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« Reply #5772 on: August 14, 2019, 07:58:44 AM »

So, the Russians who're illegally here, you're fine with them?  I'm sure it has nothing to do with color.
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« Reply #5773 on: August 14, 2019, 07:15:11 PM »

Anyone who is illegally here should be removed from here. Period.
Aliens who are legally here should be better tracked, regulated, insuring their activity is consistent with US Law and with the Visa they were issued.

Just as a parolee is contacted, expected to respond, expected to be employed, if that is what his status calls for, same for Visa covered Aliens. The same as Americans who obtain a visa and work permit overseas, are monitored. We pay people to work in the organizations who are to perform such accountability checks, and the activity of said employees may need to be monitored, if they are not able to keep track, keep us safe from their positions.

ICE needs to beef up the numbers of internal enforcement Officers, and Admin personnel, in order to effectively see that the law, and visa intent is followed.
Employers of undocumented persons must become unwelcome as a Company.

Whatever stands in the way of legal employment of documented employees, who have the Visa status, or other legal standing, and are not taking away job opportunity from Citizens and legal Residents eligible for such positions, needs to be fully addressed, laws fully enforced, and known to be enforced, in order to deter temptation of anyone to present themselves here, expecting a job.

The 'chicken industry' which is said to REQUIRE Illegal Aliens in order to do the work they do, needs to get legal, or get out of business.

Can local or even Federal Government help undocumented people to get legal?
Of course some could help a lot. Get those folks 'documented', so they may comply with the law. When the 'documentation' shows the person is not legally here, then we need to remove that person, or address the legality issues in a way to fix the situation.

Lax enforcement of law is not a good thing. And, laws need to expire, be time limited retroactively if needed, so as to clear our books of the redundancy of laws which are never or seldom enforced, simply used if at all, as a trip wire when true lawbreaking cannot be demonstrated, and "we" wish a person off the streets for some short term reason.

Lots of things need 'repair', and we need our politicians, who earn money to do such activity, must be held to account by Voters, or displaced by term limits to get the dead wood out of the way, replaced with new office holders eager and able to do their proper jobs.


So, the Russians who're illegally here, you're fine with them?  I'm sure it has nothing to do with color.
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« Reply #5774 on: August 14, 2019, 08:09:44 PM »

Anyone who is illegally here should be removed from here.

Then turn your attention to the border that's actually open.

Aliens who are legally here should be better tracked, regulated, insuring their activity is consistent with US Law and with the Visa they were issued.

Then provide Visas, and allow Amnesty.  It's a hell of a lot cheaper to make refugees American Citizens than to track millions of people, constantly.  You want to reduce government spending?  Then don't suggest a police state for millions of people based on their nation of origin, make them tax-paying Americans.

ICE needs to beef up the numbers of internal enforcement Officers, and Admin personnel, in order to effectively see that the law, and visa intent is followed.

More big government.

Employers of undocumented persons must become unwelcome as a Company.

Start with the largest companies, including the Trump organization, and work your way down.  While you're at it, collect Taxes from them to pay for all this.

deter temptation of anyone to present themselves here, expecting a job.

If they have jobs, then they don't need "Welfare," and they can pay taxes.  Who's going to work the road crews?  You?  

Can local or even Federal Government help undocumented people to get legal?

Yes, that's literally what INS was for, before it was changed to ICE.

Lax enforcement of law is not a good thing.

Funny, I didn't hear you saying that when "Justice" Cavanaugh was refusing to answer questions in an official Senate hearing.  It must depend on the laws being broken.

Lots of things need 'repair', and we need our politicians, who earn money to do such activity,

I agree.  Give everyone in Congress a shovel, and send them out to work with the road crews, until they find the money to invest in our Infrastructure.  I bet they'll find it quick, by bipartisan action, after 8 hours of that work in August.  They can start with the Beltway.

This "Tough on crime" platform would be a lot more convincing if you gave as much attention to mass murder, and government corruption as you did trespassing, and a shoplifter.

You didn't even mention illegal Russian immigrants.  That's what I asked, I know, because you quoted me.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 08:18:33 PM by psiberzerker » Logged

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