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MintJulie · 12608

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_priapism

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Reply #60 on: September 17, 2020, 03:31:11 AM
 Big 10 "buckled to pressure" a long time ago, and finally are seeing the error of their ways. Big 12 should immediately follow and begin play soonest.

  The End Is Not Near!

  Schools playing major sports... why are all Students not back in class now?  No good reason to delay until after the November election...


The Big Ten buckled to pressure and will play 8 games over a 9 week period beginning next month. Just when I  thought they were one of the smarter conferences sitting this season out....

John has no children.  No SO.  A chickenshit who advocates others putting their loved ones at risk.  Because his cult leaders tell him to.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2020, 03:34:11 AM by ToeinH2O »



Offline Athos_131

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Reply #61 on: September 18, 2020, 01:19:07 AM
For the Big Ten, the Money Was Just Too Tempting

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The coronavirus pandemic is still ravaging America, just as it was in August, when the college presidents and chancellors of the Big Ten Conference decided against playing football in the fall. The only thing that’s changed is that the same leaders now feel far more comfortable with the risks.

The Big Ten’s announcement this week that college football will begin the weekend of October 23 isn’t cause for celebration, but rather an indication of how easily money shifts priorities. Without football, the Big Ten and its member schools were in jeopardy of losing up to $1 billion in revenue.

Last month, the Big Ten was willing to set a brave example. It decided that its members, most of which are large public universities in the Midwest, would play no football this fall. But instead of being applauded for exhibiting farsighted, selfless leadership, the Big Ten has spent its hiatus being scolded by fans and parents, sued by players, and criticized by coaches. Meanwhile, Donald Trump—desperate to convince swing-state voters that nothing is amiss, despite nearly 200,000 deaths from the virus—has been meddling for his own political gain.

The Big Ten has watched as three of the four other college-football heavyweights—the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Big 12, and the Southeastern Conference—have proceeded with their football seasons with the hearty approval of fans, even though 13 games have already been postponed or canceled because of COVID-19 outbreaks and the virus has many of their campuses under siege. One SEC coach, Louisiana State’s Ed Orgeron, admitted recently that “most” of his players had contracted the virus.

The Big Ten is treating all those problems like inconvenient details now. All that matters is that midwestern football fans can look forward to nine straight weeks of conference play. Forget about the harm players might suffer in the process of entertaining the masses, or concerns of how an outbreak might jeopardize the season. Over the summer, as reports mounted of young people dying or suffering permanent damage after becoming infected with COVID-19, some Big Ten athletes banded together to demand more attention to their safety. But others insisted—in some cases by going to court—that they wanted to play.

“What we have always wanted is an opportunity for our student athletes to compete in the sports they love,” Kristina M. Johnson, the Ohio State University president, told reporters yesterday. How convenient that presidents and chancellors want to respect players’ voices as long as doing so aligns with their schools’ bottom line.

The staggering amount of money at stake helps explain why the Big Ten is now putting together aggressive testing protocols and safety measures that conference leaders hope will ensure a successful return. Players will be subjected to heart screenings that will check for cardiac ailments associated with the coronavirus. (The conference has pledged to use the data for research, which means that, on top of generating money for their university while working for free, the players are also lab rats.) Football players, coaches, and team staff at Big Ten schools will also have daily, rapid antigen testing, which detects certain proteins in the virus and is considered to be a key weapon in helping stop the spread of the virus before it reaches a highly contagious state.

Of course, the idea that a lot more testing is essential to containing the coronavirus isn’t something that only dawned on scientists this month. I suppose you could give Big Ten schools credit for listening to medical experts in developing safety protocols for college-football players, but at the same time, this is an insult to the tuition-paying students who won’t receive the same protections. When Northwestern University’s athletic director, Jim Phillips, was asked by the media yesterday why such vigorous testing isn’t available to nonathletes, he didn’t offer much of an answer. “I would just say it wasn’t done hastily,” Phillips said of the policy. “It was done with a lot of careful consideration. But it’s a really fair question.”

Some would argue that because the regular student body doesn’t usually have access to the fancy meals and other perks that college-football players often enjoy, prioritizing those players over the rest of the student body for coronavirus testing isn’t a big deal. Yet such a policy only underscores the peculiar status of college-football players. For the purposes of dividing up the revenue they create, universities treat them as mere students, disqualifying them from any financial reward beyond the value of their scholarships. But on health matters, they get special consideration because their labor is just too valuable to risk.

This is also a reason not to trust colleges and universities to be transparent if and when players become infected with the coronavirus. According to an ESPN survey, half of the schools in the five leading college-football conferences are declining to disclose the number of athletes who test positive. Some schools will hide behind medical-privacy laws to justify their secrecy. But in light of how large a financial stake athletic programs have in college-football players’ continuing presence on the field, schools don’t deserve the benefit of the doubt.

In retrospect, the Big Ten’s caving to financial pressure was entirely predictable. Much of the country has adopted the attitude that everything should go back to normal quickly, despite Americans’ collective failure to create the preconditions for doing so. This sense of resignation has also enveloped college football. The last holdout among the major conferences is the Pac-12—which, in addition to the coronavirus, must also cope with wildfires tearing through its home region. But the Pac-12 appears poised to do what the Big Ten has done: make a financially motivated decision to resume football and then find ways to rationalize it.

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Reply #62 on: September 18, 2020, 01:26:59 AM
Yeah.  Follow the money.



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Reply #63 on: September 18, 2020, 02:07:42 AM
  Shut down for two weeks, to flatten the curve of Covid19 Virus... that was the "Science" speaking loud and clear, and that is what the US did.

  The Covid19 Virus curve has been flattened, long since those 2 weeks and life goes on. The "Curve" was the worry, that due to not being in sufficient readiness in NEW YORK especially, the existing health care system would be overrun.

  Such fears turned out to be exaggerated, if not unfounded, and while a struggle of adequate delivery and storage, and stockpiling was the worry, no one who tested positive to Covid 19 went without a ventilator  for lack of supply of same. Nor did anyone die of Covid 19, due to lack of necessary other supplies, though tragically the Virus claimed many.

  Student Athletes are rightly now being addressed, as should be the rest of us, Americans and other residents who must continue to deal, as we do with many other complications, and get on with our lives, and get our economy back to as close to normal as is possible, to support the extreme costs of the "Shut Down" and the negligent continuation of same.

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Offline Athos_131

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Reply #64 on: September 18, 2020, 02:14:03 AM
We Run Down the COVID-19 Situation on Big Ten Campuses. It's Not Pretty

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The Big Ten is back from the dead.

According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, the truncated football season will start in mid October and every athlete will get daily testing beginning Sept. 30.

Antigen tests will be the way players get their rapid results. But according to the FDA, antigen tests “have a higher chance of missing an active infection,” as opposed to Molecular (PCR) tests which may take longer but are “typically highly accurate and usually does not need to be repeated.”

Additional reporting suggests that athletes will have cardiac screenings and players who test positive will have to sit for 21 days before returning to play.

Last month, Big Ten presidents voted 11-3 to postpone the season (Nebraska, Ohio State and Iowa the three schools voting to play) for health reasons associated with myocarditis, a heart ailment associated with COVID-19. Doctors and infectious disease specialists are still studying the potentially deadly heart condition in connection with COVID-19.

Recently, Dr. Wayne Sebastianelli, Penn State’s Director of Athletic Medicine said that 30-35 percent of Big Ten athletes with COVID showed symptoms of myocarditis. But those numbers have since been walked back by the school. A spokesperson downplaying the numbers saying they were shared prematurely from a “forthcoming study which unbeknownst to him at the time had been published at a lower rate.”

So, apparently it’s all safe to play now! Right? Well, here’s what’s happening on every Big Ten campus with regards to COVID.

Most of the conference is in the midwest, where new cases have recently reached record levels.

Illinois

Illinois has the most COVID cases of any university in the state — 1,760 — almost as high as New Zealand’s total caseload since the outbreak started. Over the summer, at least 18 football players contracted COVID. They were some of the only students on campus because of preseason training. 23 athletes, total, have contracted the virus.

Yesterday, Illinois Governor JB Pritzker doubled down on his decision to postpone Illinois high school fall sports, including football.

He told reporters that other states have “decided to endanger children and families...by allowing certain contact sports to take place, that’s their decision. That’s not something that’s good for the families, the children of Illinois.”

Indiana

After a relatively successful campus opening in August, Indiana has recommended closing all greek houses after “increasingly alarming” rates of positive COVID tests.

Iowa

The University of Iowa has reported 1,804 positive cases of COVID. The school has also canceled spring break for students but will allow athletes to travel around the midwest.

482 Iowa faculty, staff, and students have “requested alternative working and learning spaces” as classes remain in person.

Maryland

When athletes were the only ones on campus last week, UMD announced that it would suspend all athletic activities because of a spike in COVID cases. “The most recent testing results have revealed an uptick in positive tests among Maryland student-athletes,” said Maryland athletic director, Damon Evans. “Out of an abundance of caution, we are temporarily pausing all workouts for our programs.”

UMD athletics have since resumed, just in time for thousands of other students to return to campus. Students arrived on Monday after in-person learning was delayed two weeks.

Michigan

Ten percent of the Michigan dance department is in quarantine and the university dance building is closed after students and faculty came in contact with folks who tested positive for COVID. Dance, like sports, is an athletic activity that cannot be done virtually.

In an email to dance students, the chair of the dance department wrote, “I know this is not what any of us would prefer to do but I think it’s the only way we can contribute to the ongoing safety and well-being of the students, while also providing a safe working environment for all faculty and staff.”

Also, the graduate student workers at Michigan are striking in part for better COVID protections.

Michigan has recorded 344 cases since campus reopened.

Michigan State

Michigan State students were supposed to arrive on campus to a hybrid learning environment. They never showed up. Before freshman move-in day Michigan State President Samuel Stanley, a “distinguished biomedical researcher,” told students that the university would shift to virtual learning. “It has become evident to me that, despite our best efforts and strong planning, it is unlikely we can prevent widespread transmission of COVID-19 between students if our undergraduates return to campus,” Stanley said in August.

Today, MSU students are being asked to quarantine as virus cases in East Lansing skyrocket. Ingham County Health Officer, Linda S. Vail, called the growing caseload caused by off-campus parties, “an urgent situation.”

“The exponential growth of COVID-19 cases must stop,” Vail said. “I am concerned about the health and safety of the MSU community, and importantly, I am seriously concerned that unchecked transmission locally will affect the health and safety of all Ingham County residents. If we do not slow the spread immediately, we will be dealing with the consequences across the county for months to come.”

While students learn online this fall, Stanley now will allow athletes to take the field on campus.

Minnesota

Students at the University of Minnesota moved into their dorms yesterday after weeks of delay. Somehow, the university already has 124 cases. Let’s see what happens when thousands of students move into a major metro area, that being Minneapolis, to begin in-person learning.

Can’t see ANYTHING going wrong here.

Nebraska

At the end of August, eight Nebraska players sued the Big Ten over the league’s decision to postpone the fall sports season. And in the last two weeks, Nebraska’s state caseload has risen for a second time. State cases are up 14 percent over two weeks. In the same timeframe, COVID death rates in Nebraska are, tragically, up by 74 percent. Where are many cases coming from? Lancaster County, home of Nebraska’s flagship campus — a hotspot county according to the New York Times.

Lincoln, Neb. currently has 504 cases.

Northwestern

It should come as no surprise that the smallest Big Ten school has the lowest number of cases — 73. With the Big Ten set to play in October, Northwestern will kick off their football season before Chicago public schools open for face to face learning.

 

Penn State

Last week, Penn State paused all athletic activities after a spike in COVID cases. 48 athletes caught the virus and hundreds of students tested positive since the school reopened.

Purdue

Over the weekend, 29 housing units including some dorms, fraternities and sororities, were under quarantine. The university has 322 cases.

Rutgers

The Scarlet Knights had “at least” 30 football players contract the virus when the team returned to campus in June. Returning coach Greg Schiano said the outbreak was “like getting hit by a two-by-four.”

The Rutgers outbreak was the worst in Big Ten football.

Ohio State


Ohio State has the most COVID cases of any college in the state — 1,528.

Wisconsin

To slow the spread of COVID, UW-Madison recently announced that spring break has been canceled. But travel sports? Fly away!

Wisconsin Chancellor Rebecca Blank spoke at yesterday’s senate hearing on college athlete compensation. She told Sen. Tim Kaine (D - VA) that she supported the conference’s original decision to postpone the fall season. The forthcoming decision from Big Ten, she said, would be made by all university presidents. She also told the committee that the school is not, “sponsoring college sports because of its potential to make money.”

Ok.

Oh, and UW has already reported 2,138 cases since school reopened, that’s more cases than the state of Vermont (since March). Last week, the campus suspended face-to-face instruction and the school has “threatened more drastic action” as the campus outbreak spreads into Madison. Students from two dorm buildings have also been quarantined.

Thankfully, there won’t be fans in the stands, so 90,000 or so people won’t risk being exposed every Saturday.

Still, football is back in the Big Ten for many reasons. But not because these campuses are safer or healthier than they were weeks ago.

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Reply #65 on: September 18, 2020, 02:58:21 AM
It’s Hard to Socially Distance When You’re an Offensive Lineman – College Football Cancellations Begin

Quote
Welcome to this circus, Big Ten.

Today the Charlotte 49ers football team canceled Saturday’s matchup against UNC-Chapel Hill due to a coronavirus outbreak among the squad.

According to a school statement, a number of Charlotte offensive lineman have been placed in quarantine due to the school’s COVID-19 contact tracing guidelines. Without an O-line, the team had no choice but to cancel its upcoming game.

In the past two weeks, Charlotte has reported 3 positive COVID cases on the football team.

“We’re extremely disappointed to have to cancel our game at North Carolina,” Charlotte Athletic Director Mike Hill said in a statement. “While I know our team is heartbroken, due to the number of players in quarantine, we could not safely play.”

Hill said the 49ers have no open dates to reschedule a game with UNC.

UNC head coach Mack Brown, 69, said he is “disappointed we won’t have the chance to play” but “completely understand” Charlotte’s decision.

The Charlotte-UNC game is the fifth college football game of week three to be canceled or postponed. Army vs. BYU, Houston vs. Memphis, Arkansas State vs. Arkansas, and Virginia Tech vs. UVA have all been scrapped because of COVID.

The ACC has already said that the conference needs at least 50 percent (8 out of 15 teams) to play during the week to warrant continuing a season. The conference will have 12 teams playing this week as long as no other team has an outbreak.

The ACC and SEC are the only power 5 conferences to agree to play a non-conference game. In the ACC, the non conference matchup has to be played in the in member schools “home state.”

UNC had their own COVID outbreak on campus in August. The college newspaper, the Daily Tar Heel, called the situation a “clusterfuck” and students were sent home around a week after moving in. The only members of the student body who stayed put during the outbreak were, of course, UNC athletes.

This news of canceled games comes on the heels of the Big Ten’s announcement to start their season in mid October.

If these first three weeks serve as any indication for the future of college football in a pandemic, universities will do whatever it takes to get football on the field until the virus inevitably spreads to the locker room.

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Offline Athos_131

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Reply #66 on: September 18, 2020, 01:17:20 PM
Hey Big Ten, How About Daily COVID Testing for My Kid?

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Well, the Big Ten finally cracked.

It was always too much to ask that possibly the only good decision the organization has ever made with regard to the well-being of student-athletes stand. After weeks of pressure from parents, brain-dead politicians, and a sentient lump of ear wax in the White House, the Big Ten announced today it will return to football at the end of October. For once, they had made the right decision but America browbeat them into reversing course, because that’s what America is these days. Ignorance and selfishness rule the land.

Nevermind that COVID is spiking at college campuses all over the country. Nevermind that just today, multiple White House staffers tested positive for the virus. Nevermind that President Trump curiously only seems to care about college football being played in toss-up states, not deep blue states, say, for example, like California, Washington and Oregon. The mouth breathers that refuse to wear masks want their college football, dammit.

And now they’re getting it.

The Big Ten was quick to let everyone know that they’ve “adopted significant medical protocols,” to keep everyone “safe, including daily antigen testing. Positive antigen tests will then require a more-stringent PCR test to confirm the finding. All this, despite the fact that the FDA’s website says that negative antigen tests may also need to be confirmed by a PCR test. So what is the point of the antigen test at all? Maybe we should ask the Big Ten.

But I’ve got another question: Right now, my son is holed up in an off-campus apartment at a Big Ten University. It was an agonizing decision to let him go to school at all. But, as his college was one of the first to shut down as COVID ramped up in the spring, my husband and I begrudgingly allowed him to try. Since then, he’s been confined mostly to his apartment, outside of taking walks and throwing the football around with his roommates. We’ve stressed the importance of creating a “bubble” to his group of friends, and for the most part, they’ve stuck to it (as far as we know). But it means no trips to campus, no parties, no activities, no hanging out in each other’s apartments — in short, nothing that makes college, well college.

Our son was tested when he got to school, but hasn’t been tested since, as all of his classes are online. What’s more, he can’t even get a test unless he suspects he has COVID. So, Big Ten, can my kid get daily testing and “enhanced” medical support in the event he tests positive? I mean, it’s all about the students, right? I’d love for things to return to semi-normal for my kid, and if the B1G can get these tests for athletes, surely they can get them for the rest of the students, too.

I’m being facetious of course. If my child was a college athlete, I wouldn’t let him anywhere near his sport, and I have serious concerns about the fitness of the parents who are screaming to do so. And I certainly wouldn’t put my kid’s safety in the hands of the Big Ten or college football coaches, who have been screaming ignorance into the void since this entire thing began. I mean, it’s not like the Big Ten has a raging history of ignoring the safety of students or anything.

Just yesterday, LSU coach Ed Orgeron admitted that “most of his team” has contracted the virus.


“Most of our players have caught it,” Orgeron said. “I think that hopefully they won’t catch it again, and hopefully they’re not out for games.”

Right. With all the evidence that COVID can lead to lingering heart damage, even in young, asymptomatic people, the real concern here is whether or not players miss games. Games seem to be the priority here, and an absolutely asinine number of people responsible for the care of young people seem to agree with Orgeron. We’re gonna need a remake of Idiocracy, because the original is starting to look more like a documentary than a farce.

At this point, it’s impossible to change the minds of those who believe COVID is a hoax, believe masks are part of a conspiracy, or who care about watching college football over and above the good of everything else in society. But as long as daily testing is supposedly making this “safe” for players, shouldn’t they also be available to college students on campus right now? Though my son doesn’t have to go on campus for classes, his school is in “hybrid” mode, meaning some of his roommates do. He interacts with them each and every day. That seems at least as risky as football practice. Shouldn’t we have “significant medical protocols” for all those students living and studying on campuses right now? Because if my child tests positive, we don’t have access to the “enhanced cardiac screening” the Big Ten is making available to athletes.

To be clear, I don’t believe any students — athletes or not — should be put in a position to contract COVID right now. If most parents had their way, we’d keep our kids safely ensconced at home until this entire pandemic is over. And I certainly don’t begrudge schools taking care of their athletes the best way they know how, no matter how ill-advised their decision to return to play is.

But each week, students from my son’s campus are now going to interact with players from other schools. They’re going to spit and scream and climb all over each other. Then they’re going to take whatever they pick up back to campus and spread it around. It’s inevitable. We can’t get grown adults to stop partying and defying bubble rules, how can we expect college students to be flawless in this regard?

Big Ten football is not only dangerous for athletes, it endangers the entire campus community. There’s no way for it not to.

So, Big Ten, when can my kid expect to start getting his daily test?

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Reply #67 on: September 18, 2020, 01:21:06 PM


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Reply #68 on: September 22, 2020, 09:40:07 PM
Notre Dame-Wake Forest football game postponed after more positive coronavirus tests

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The Notre Dame-Wake Forest football game scheduled for Saturday has been postponed after the Irish announced 13 players are in isolation.

In a statement Tuesday, Notre Dame said seven players tested positive for coronavirus out of 94 tests done Monday. Combined with testing results from last week, 13 players are in isolation, with 10 in quarantine. As a result, Notre Dame has paused all football-related activities. The two schools are working on a date to reschedule the game.

"With student-athlete health and safety our primary focus, we will continue to follow our prevention protocols and ongoing testing procedures," Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said in a statement. "We managed an increase in positivity rates in August, and the players handled it wonderfully.

"We knew COVID would present challenges throughout the season, and we'll always put student-athlete health and safety at the forefront of our decision making. We look forward to resuming team activities and getting back on the playing field."

Wake Forest athletic director John Currie said in a statement they are working on rescheduling the game for Oct. 3, an open date the two schools share.

"I know everyone involved is saddened to be unable to play this weekend, but based on the circumstances it is the right decision," Currie said in a statement. "We are already discussing options for rescheduling with the ACC and our future opponents, including the possibility of playing on the October 3rd weekend."

Notre Dame beat South Florida 52-0 at home last Saturday and opened the season with a win over Duke.

This is not the first time this season the Irish have had to pause practices. They also paused for three days last month after five positive results during two rounds of testing.

This is now the fourth ACC game impacted because of coronavirus issues.

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Offline Athos_131

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Reply #69 on: September 22, 2020, 11:55:16 PM
The Big Ten’s plan to restart football subverts the rights of students

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The Big Ten is about to start playing football again.

As University of Michigan alumni and ardent college football fans, we would love nothing more than to don our maize and blue and cheer for our team this fall. There is no doubt that the return of college football would provide us with a sense of normalcy in these scary times. And, yet, our professions — doctor/medical ethicist and sports lawyer, respectively — teach us that there is an important difference between really liking college football and our communal obligation to protect our college athletes. Sometimes we need to sacrifice self-interest and pursuit of revenue for the greater good. In this case, we believe respect for the greater good means the season should not go forward.

Given the relative success of some professional sports leagues during the pandemic, you might think we are being too risk averse with this declaration. But there is a fundamentally different standard for running a professional sports league and managing college sports at a university.

Crucially, NFL team owners do not have tens of thousands of students to protect, and they must collectively bargain over salaries and safety protocols with a players’ union before play can begin. College sports programs, meanwhile, unilaterally set the protocols that their athletes must follow and do not have a mandatory process to give their athletes a voice in negotiating over the financial terms or safety protocols for their sport. The entire Big Ten plan to restart college football subverts the rights of the football players to protect themselves and their teammates.

The Big Ten’s self-professed rationale for reinstituting fall football is based upon its updated understanding about the transmission of the coronavirus, as well as an improved plan to monitor and protect players involved. It has set out a rigorous return-to-play proposal, which includes frequent covid-19 testing and strict rules in clearing players who have tested positive. Nonetheless, even the conference’s best effort leaves reason for concern.

The Big Ten’s proposal fails on multiple levels. The scale of the testing that will be required could further strain our already fragile testing infrastructure at a time when campuses are already stretched thin to respond to

outbreaks. These issues will only grow more pronounced when the return of college football inevitably leads to social gatherings among students, alumni and other fans that violate social distancing principles and risk further spread across campuses and local communities. This not only puts individual students at risk, but also hurts the entire campus community, including older professors, staff with underlying health conditions and the kindergartners of local residents who are stuck learning remotely at their kitchen tables so college athletes can play and fans can watch.

But there is also a set of less immediately obvious issues related to the rights of the athletes themselves.

“Student-athletes” (to use the term that the NCAA prefers) are purported amateurs, who have been denied the legal right to form a union and to bargain over matters pertaining to their own safety and well-being. Consequently, they rely on their universities and their athletic conferences to keep them healthy. It is not clear that the Big Ten’s plan to restart college football takes into account the long-term financial and medical needs of college football players if they were to contract covid-19.

For example, the Big Ten plan does not guarantee football players with lifetime medical coverage for any chronic condition that may arise from covid-19. In addition, the Big Ten plan does not provide for loss-of-value coverage if contracting the virus were to reduce a player’s future earning potential either as a professional athlete or in any other line of work. Without a union-like body to represent Big Ten football players, these student-athletes did not even have an organized voice to bring up these important, insurance-related concerns.

Further, one element of the Big Ten’s proposed plan to restart college football — the establishment of a cardiac registry to monitor the effects of covid-19 — particularly raises questions about student-athletes’ right to privacy. The registry requires all covid-19 positive student-athletes to undergo comprehensive cardiac testing, which will be entered into a data registry to “answer many of the unknowns regarding the cardiac manifestations in p positive elite athletes.” While a registry of this nature may help us to better understand the long-term medical risks associated with covid-19, important details regarding the registry are not yet public. We do not know if they will ask students for permission to include and share their data. Even if they do, it is hard to imagine that college football players will be able to provide informed consent free from coercion. And what might this mean for their future careers?

Even if students are asked permission, in a system where NCAA member schools already collectively mandate that college athletes provide their labor free to a multibillion dollar commercial enterprise, suggesting that these same athletes will really get to decide whether to share private medical information is dubious at best. For example, we know many people don’t want their information shared or used for research, even when they are assured it is confidential. Such concerns are all the more pronounced when these athletes have little other recourse for treatment or care.

In May, U-M Athletic Director Warde Manuel said, “We can’t play games with peoples’ health and safety.” The conference initially took these wise words to heart, and the Big Ten Conference had its decision right the first time. It is a real shame that its leadership has now fumbled the ball.

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Reply #70 on: October 11, 2020, 01:43:02 AM



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Reply #71 on: October 31, 2020, 09:56:44 PM
Michigan State beats #13 Michigan!!! Must have been all that pussy I ate this morning.



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Reply #72 on: November 01, 2020, 05:38:39 AM
Texas beats undefeated #6 Oklahoma State in overtime.  First win on the road against a top ten opponent since 2010.  We still suck of course, but I’ll take a Halloween road trip win.




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Reply #73 on: November 29, 2020, 01:24:40 AM
Congratulations Sarah Fuller for being the first woman to play in a power 5 conference game (whatever the hell that is).  She made history with the second half kickoff.  Just a matter of time before we're taking up spots in the NFL.



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Reply #74 on: November 29, 2020, 01:39:29 AM
She’s an ace soccer player (football in any other language), and was called up when the Vanderbilt kicker was quarantined for Covid-19. And she did a great job.  Congratulations.



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Reply #75 on: November 29, 2020, 08:44:15 AM
Congratulations Sarah Fuller for being the first woman to play in a power 5 conference game (whatever the hell that is).

The Power 5 is made up of the biggest athletic conferences, including the SEC, Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Big Ten Conference, Big 12 Conference and Pac-12 Conference.  Vanderbilt (0-8) is a member of the SEC.



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Reply #76 on: November 29, 2020, 04:12:48 PM
Sarah Fuller amazed the football coaches when she was kicking the soccer ball 45 yards through the uprights. She began the second half of the game with someone holding the football instead of using a tee.  Since kickers are a critical component of football games, I hope she is the first of many women to play these critical parts during a football game.

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Reply #77 on: December 12, 2020, 11:55:24 PM
Watched her score, but I’m a Tennessee fan and it looked like Vandy is going 0-9.



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Reply #78 on: January 02, 2021, 03:23:16 PM
Least one Big Ten team made it to the finals. Ohio State outplayed Clemson.  Notre Dame lost to Alabama so Ohio State will play Alabama for the championship.

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Reply #79 on: January 02, 2021, 03:59:51 PM
Last year, the Texas Longhorns were the only Big 12 team to win a bowl game. This year, the Big 12 was on fire, and won every bowl game contest it played. Oklahoma absolutely dismantled Florida.  And Texas trounced a decimated Colorado team.