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Author Topic: What did you learn today  (Read 20957 times)
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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #1545 on: November 09, 2020, 04:41:03 PM »

Today is the 82nd anniversary of Kristallnacht - the beginning of the Holocaust or mans inhumanity towards others.

Hardly the beginning of man’s inhumanity towards others, and certainly not the end...
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MissBarbara
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« Reply #1546 on: November 09, 2020, 08:11:38 PM »


WARNING! ANOTHER LONG AND BORING MISS BARBARA HISTORY LESSON!

Most Americans who have a working knowledge of U.S. history know that in the Fall of 1796, as he was nearing the end of his second term, George Washington gave his famous "Farewell Address," in which he announced he would not seek a third term.

By doing so, Washington set a precedent that a president should serve no more than two terms, and that precedent was scrupulously followed for close to 150 years, until Franklin Roosevelt ran for, and won, a third term in 1940.

A few years after FDR died in office, Congress passed and the states ratified the 22nd Amendment, which constitutionally limited a U.S. president to two full terms.

Here's the problem: That story has little basis in fact.

The U.S. Constitution makes no mention of presidential term limits, and in the Constitutional convention, while the president's term was initially slated as one seven-year term with no possibility of re-election, it was ultimately decided that the president would serve a four-year term, and be eligible for re-election. That proposal was agreed to nearly unanimously.

It's true that George Washing retired from the presidency after two terms, and refused to run for a third term. However, Washington never cited this as a precedent, nor did he assert -- neither in the Farewell Address nor anywhere else -- that a president should not serve more than two terms.

When Washington retired from the presidency at the end of his second term, he did so for personal reasons. On June 17, 1775, the Continental Congress named Washington Commander in Chief, and on March 4, 1797, George Washington’s second term as president ended. During that entire span of 22 years, Washington remained in almost constant service to his country. He was tired, and he wanted to retire to his home in Virginia. More to the point, Washington feared that he might die in office if he ran for an won a third term, thereby giving the impression that presidents should serve for life.

In January 1808, the final year of his second term, Thomas Jefferson announced that he would not seek a third term. He did not cite Washington’s precedent, but rather, the same reasons as Washington:

"I am sensible of that decline which advancing years bring on: and feeling their Physical, I ought not to doubt their Mental effect. happy, if I am the first to perceive and to obey this admonition of nature, and to solicit a retreat from cares too great for the wearied faculties of age."

Nor have any of the other two-term presidents between Jefferson and FDR -- Madison, Monroe, Jackson, Grant, Cleveland, Teddy Roosevelt, Wilson, and Coolidge -- cite Washington’s stepping down after two terms as a precedent.

In fact, Franklin Roosevelt was the second president with that last name to run for a third term. Teddy Roosevelt succeeded to the presidency in 1901 when McKinley was assassinated only a few months after beginning his second term, and TR served out that term, and then won a second term in his own right in 1904. In 1908, he declined to run for a third term, but in 1912, he did, in fact run for a third term.

Teddy Roosevelt wasn't the first president to ignore Washington's "precedent." Nearing the end of his second term in 1876, Grant considered running for a third term, and only decided not to after being convinced otherwise by party officials. Four years later, Grant ran for a third term in 1880. He was the overwhelming front-runner at the 1880 GOP Convention in Chicago in June, he led by a wide margin on the first ballot, and on 35 subsequent ballots. But he failed to earn the needed majority to win the nomination. Finally, James Garfield was named as a compromise candidate on the 26th ballot, and Grant reluctantly released his delegates, and Garfield won the nomination.

In 1896 Grover Cleveland, who was completing his second (non-consecutive) term, also tried to win a third term. At the July convention, Cleveland's hopes were steamrolled by a young, out-spoken Midwestern populist, and Will Jennings Bryant won the nomination unanimously on the fifth ballot.

In other words, "Washington's precedent" never existed. It was never cited, it was never followed, and, despite being an unofficial precedent, it was deliberately ignored at least three times before FDR won the 1940 election.






« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 03:01:03 PM by MissBarbara » Logged


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« Reply #1547 on: November 09, 2020, 08:22:24 PM »

I learned another thing today, thanks to KB's History teacher -MissB.  Thank you.  Cool

But the way our country is so divided, I doubt any president will be a two term or more president in the near future, especially if they are in their late 70s when first elected.
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« Reply #1548 on: November 10, 2020, 01:15:43 PM »

I learned that George Washington was elected unanimously -- twice. He essentially ran unopposed in both 1788 and 1992.

The election of 1796 was the first contested American presidential election and the only one to elect a President and Vice President from opposing tickets.

edit: I have decided not to correct 1992 to 1792 because Chirp's comment below made me laugh so hard. Thank you CJ! What makes it even funnier is that I pointed out someone else's typo on a date only hours earlier.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 02:02:28 PM by purpleshoes » Logged
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« Reply #1549 on: November 10, 2020, 03:07:19 PM »

I learned that George Washington was elected unanimously -- twice. He essentially ran unopposed in both 1788 and 1992.

The election of 1796 was the first contested American presidential election and the only one to elect a President and Vice President from opposing tickets.

Holy crap! 1992? He hung in there didn't he?   emot_weird
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« Reply #1550 on: November 10, 2020, 04:31:44 PM »


Sometimes long but never boring, MissB.  By absolute conicidence, yesterday I was reading about FDR on Wikipedia because I had in the back of my mind that there had been a President that served more than two terms.  Wikipedia states that FDR won a fourth term in 1944 but died only three months into the term.  Are they correct?

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MissBarbara
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« Reply #1551 on: November 10, 2020, 04:45:16 PM »


I learned that George Washington was elected unanimously -- twice. He essentially ran unopposed in both 1788 and 1992.

The election of 1796 was the first contested American presidential election and the only one to elect a President and Vice President from opposing tickets.


Holy crap! 1992? He hung in there didn't he?   emot_weird


You're right, that's another little-known fact of American history. And when Washington finally retired in 1992, he was really, really tired.

Wink


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MissBarbara
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« Reply #1552 on: November 10, 2020, 04:57:57 PM »


I learned that George Washington was elected unanimously -- twice. He essentially ran unopposed in both 1788 and 1792.

The election of 1796 was the first contested American presidential election and the only one to elect a President and Vice President from opposing tickets.


Not exactly.

While Washington won the electoral vote unanimously in both elections, he didn't run unopposed, and other candidates received popular votes.

In 1788-89, John Adams, John Jay, John Rutledge, John Hancock (yes, it was a requirement in that era that all presidential candidates be named John), and George Clinton all received popular votes, and in 1792. George Clinton, Thomas Jefferson, and Aaron Burr received popular votes.

Jefferson and Burr would win the 1800 presidential election, and George Clinton (who was unrelated to the founder of Parliament Funkadelic), would serve as vice president under both Jefferson and Adams. George Clinton's nephew, DeWitt Clinton, would serve as both mayor of New York City and Governor of New York, and he's best known today as the man who was the prime mover behind the planning and construction of the Erie Canal.

Speaking of the "other" George Clinton:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/gBWH3OWfT2Y&rel=1" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/gBWH3OWfT2Y&rel=1</a>




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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #1553 on: November 11, 2020, 03:48:48 AM »

Eight years is a very long time to hold any job, much less one that is under constant scrutiny, commented on daily, and requires 24/7/365 diligence.  If you look at the “before” and “after” photos of recent White House occupants, you can see the side affects of being POTUS.
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« Reply #1554 on: November 17, 2020, 06:31:20 PM »

The New York Times reports that duck-billed platypuses glow under a black light. Psychedelic!



                    ^ Regular light                   ^ UV light                       ^ Extra crispy
« Last Edit: November 17, 2020, 06:36:27 PM by Sweetums » Logged

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« Reply #1555 on: November 19, 2020, 03:53:12 PM »

This is mainly for our resident birder, msslave -

I learned yesterday that, in our city, there is a 17 year old high schooler who just broke the record for spotting 282 different types of birds and just in the city and the surrounding forest preserves.  He has photographed, either by camera or his cellphone, each type of bird.

I definitely would have lost a bet if someone asked me how many types of birds are in the area.
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« Reply #1556 on: November 19, 2020, 04:02:19 PM »

That's an impressive "life list" for one so young.

I don't keep a list... that's for "birders". I'm into photography and birds are a fun subject. There's actually a difference between birders and photographers.

Birders are happy to just ID a bird. Photographer's want to get a clear sharp picture.

Have a friend who went to Peru a couple years ago to add to his list. He broke 1000!
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« Reply #1557 on: November 20, 2020, 10:40:20 PM »

I learned that my little Dalmatian / Border Collie mix can stand on my balls without too much discomfort on my part. I hasten to add that I discovered this in a completely innocuous and random chance manner. I honestly don’t aspire to turning my little pup into a ball-busting dominatrix.
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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #1558 on: November 21, 2020, 12:47:08 AM »

I learned that my little Dalmatian / Border Collie mix can stand on my balls without too much discomfort on my part. I hasten to add that I discovered this in a completely innocuous and random chance manner. I honestly don’t aspire to turning my little pup into a ball-busting dominatrix.

I remember the story a few years ago about a man who passed out, and his dog ate two of his toes (he was a diabetic). Rather than be mad, the man said he was grateful, because it seems to toe eating woke him well enough up to call 911.
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« Reply #1559 on: November 21, 2020, 06:23:59 AM »

I learned that my little Dalmatian / Border Collie mix can stand on my balls without too much discomfort on my part. I hasten to add that I discovered this in a completely innocuous and random chance manner. I honestly don’t aspire to turning my little pup into a ball-busting dominatrix.

I remember the story a few years ago about a man who passed out, and his dog ate two of his toes (he was a diabetic). Rather than be mad, the man said he was grateful, because it seems to toe eating woke him well enough up to call 911.

I don’t think that girl would ever chow down on me, though I have owned cats that gave me pause. Like Twinklefluff the Ninja Cat. She would leave half of everything she caught on the welcome mat, split right down the symmetry line. Exactly. You would swear she owned a circular saw.
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