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Racism is alive and well, Thanks Trump and his supporters!

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Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1590 on: August 31, 2020, 05:06:35 PM
4 years ago, still relevant.

Colin Kaepernick and What White Fans Don’t Understand About Black Athletes

Quote
If there’s one thing Colin Kaepernick has shown us this week, it’s that when a black athlete steps out of line in the eyes of white America, it is clear who is going to overreact, and who’s going to understand.

To those outside the black community, people who are largely unaware of the nuances of black life in America, professional athletes speaking out on social issues appears to be breaking news. To black people, however, they have seen this hustle. They know it when they see it. They have seen the likes of Jack Johnson (beats white men in the ring, dates white women), Muhammad Ali (his Muslim faith), Allen Iverson (tattoos and cornrows), Cam Newton (touchdown celebrations, being black in a space usually reserved for white men), Serena Williams (her body and hair) and now San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick all written and talked about by white sportswriters who take a paternal tone and an air of understanding what goes on in their lives and communities. Yet those who pride themselves on scooping their colleagues on the next big story or writing the hottest of takes can’t figure out what ails many of the people they cover.

This is a tale of two views, and it is black and white.

Many of those views assume that Kaepernick, who decided not the stand for the national anthem before a game last week, can’t be oppressed because he’s rich and that he was adopted by white parents, and wonder why he hasn’t focused on “black-on-black” violence and issues. Curt Schilling, the Alt-Right’s next great white hope after Donald Trump, chimed in with his thoughts, Trump himself said the quarterback should consider looking for another country “that works better for him.” Telling black people and other minorities to go to find another country to live in is one of the oldest racist tropes out there, but this is Trump we’re talking about, of course. Yet it goes beyond politicians. Hub Arkush, executive editor of Pro Football Weekly, tweeted that Kaepernick should be grateful for making the money his does. A big change from last season, Arkush thought that the Chicago Bears should trade for the quarterback. Clay Travis of Fox Sports called Kaepernick “a fucking idiot” and wondered “what does the United States do to oppress black people?” and peppered it all with a handful of backhanded compliments.

No one is calling the writers racist. However, the tone that some sportswriters use in these instances is racially insensitive at best, and it’s something black people are all too familiar with. We openly talk about these topics in church, at the barbershop and in Facebook groups. We see it in the critiques of President Obama, with All/Police/Blue Lives Matter, and in every comment section of an article on Chicago’s heartbreaking violence. We often take on that weight. It is an added layer to what goes with black life in America.

The idea that racism doesn’t affect athletes is a myth, an urban legend propped up by the system that perpetuates many of the problems black people in America face to this day. It’s the people that don’t face these problems that don’t understand that. Just earlier this year, Seattle Seahawks safety Kam Chancellor was looking to buy a gym and the employees called the police on him. This happened after he signed a contract extension worth $28 million last season. Before that, it was the racial slurs hurled at Richard Sherman over social media for his rant after the NFC Championship game a few years back. Remember when Atlanta Hawks guard Thabo Sefolosha got his leg broken by NYPD officers? He’s a one percenter as well, but he’s not immune.

“When I go home, I get pulled over just because,” Tennessee Titans linebacker David Bass said about going back to his hometown of St. Louis, “and they’ll say, ‘We’re doing random checks,’ which is against the law. Or they say, there was a theft and the getaway car was like my black Durango. When they don’t know who you are, all you are is black. They don’t know that I graduated from college, or that I’m in the NFL. But when they find that out, they want to stop and have a conversation.”

Since Kaepernick’s public stance, he’s turned into Public Enemy Number One, but he’s also exposing this vicious cycle. His stance has made more people stand up and ask, exactly, why he’s having his feet held to the fire for exercising his American right to protest and free speech. Black athletes and black sports analyst are often told to “stick to sports” when they venture out of the comfort zone of white male Americana. Bradley Zimanek, a Montgomery Advertiser columnist once suggested that ESPN football analyst Andre Ware favored Blake Sims as the Alabama quarterback over Jake Coker, who’s white, because both are black.

“This is not something that I am going to run by anybody,” Kaepernick told NFL Network. “I am not looking for approval. I have to stand up for people that are oppressed. … If they take football away, my endorsements from me, I know that I stood up for what is right.”

This is what black athletes have to deal with and always have dealt with.

Since Kaepernick didn’t stand for the national anthem, everyone has offered an opinion on him. John Isner, the highest-ranking American player in men’s tennis, “I thought it was pathetic from him,” Isner told reporters. “The cause he was going for, fine by me. He could have found some other ways to present his voice there. A lot of NBA players have done it, and good on ’em.” It was one of the most willfully ignorant reactions to Kaepernick outside of Rodney Harrison who said of Kaepernick, “He’s not black.”

On the other side, there’s NFL Hall of Famer Jim Brown, a legend in the realm of activist athletes and arguably the greatest football player ever. He was happy to see players like Kaepernick speak out on society’s ills, saying, “And for a couple of generations it was about making money, not messing with your image. And the agents became the pivotal figure for a lot of these guys,” Brown told NFL Total Access. “And the agents kept reminding them that you have to be this all-American boy to make these kind of dollars and these dollars are astronomical dollars. So the money came into the culture and created a couple of generations of individuals who did not want to speak up.”

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar also weighed in, writing for the Washington Post: “What should horrify Americans is not Kaepernick’s choice to remain seated during the national anthem, but that nearly 50 years after Ali was banned from boxing for his stance and Tommie Smith and John Carlos’ raised fists caused public ostracization and numerous death threats, we still need to call attention to the same racial inequities.” He went on to write: “Failure to fix this problem is what’s really un-American here.”

And then there’s the #VeteransForKaepernick hashtag that’s been trending on Twitter over the last 24 hours. Black veterans who fought for this country voicing their support for a man’s right to do something they’re put in harm’s way to protect: speak up. The very people politicians are trying to say Kaepernick is disrespecting with his protest are the offering up some of the clearest and smartest takes on the matter. Not sportswriters or pundits. It was interesting to see that the people they were trying to prop up as “Negro Firewall,” joined Kaepernick in calling them out.

Racism is much more complex than we like to imagine. It’s more than a word; it’s a system that is backed up money, politics and the criminal justice system. We live in a country where when media pundits called U.S. swimmer Ryan Lochte, a 32-year-old man, a “kid,” for lying about his brotastic experience at the Rio Olympics, but a Cleveland police officer can kill Tamir Rice for doing just that – being a kid. A country where Kaepernick is deemed as being unpatriotic, for exercising his constitutional right to freedom of speech, but Dylann Roof can burn the American flag and walk into an A.M.E. church and murder people. A country where a presidential candidate whose slogan is “Make America Great Again,” wants to criticize a black man who just wants justice is the epitome of not just hypocrisy, but it’s also downright fucking absurd. Black lives seem to matter on game day when America needs to be entertained. The rest of the week, not so much.

Kaepernick used his platform, for all intents and purposes, to call America on its shit. There’s nothing wrong with loving our country, while having an honest conversation on how we can make things better. No laws were broken and nobody was hurt. He was just exercising his right to get some peace of mind.

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline joan1984

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Reply #1591 on: August 31, 2020, 06:40:35 PM
You may well be correct. What I posted, relative to your report of the missing
U-Haul van, was reported "here" and many places online:

https://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/police-us-marshals-stop-caravan-from-out-of-state-heading-into-kenosha-with-gas-cans-and-riot-gear-2/

Andy Ngo, Photojournalist with experience, contacts around Seattle/Portland and other areas, further stated in his reporting that "The Riot Kitchen" group sponsored the persons, vehicles seized in the arrest described regarding "the three vehicles",
which were found to have Gasoline, Protective Vests, Masks, Illegal Fireworks, and the like when seized, and those vehicles were impounded.

My post intended to impart that the Law Enforcement folks who seized those Three
vehicles may well know, maybe also were involved with the 'church' U-Haul Van and the two persons who were last seen headed for Kenosha with 'supplies'.

I have not seen any report, save your report here, regarding the church U-Haul.


I fail to see where Mr. Ngo claims this group was doing more than providing food to those exercising their constitutionally granted right to assemble.

Perhaps you can cite the post?

It appears you are wrong, or trying to obfuscate for nefarious purpose.

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

Some people are like the 'slinky'. Not really good for much, but they bring a smile to your face as they fall down stairs.


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1592 on: August 31, 2020, 08:03:54 PM
Bravo.

It took you a full day of whining to claim Mr. Ngo reported this, when your link comes from a yellow site, linking to a local news site.  None of these credit Mr. Ngo.

I certainly hope you are not being compensated for your meager and ineffective efforts.

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1593 on: August 31, 2020, 08:42:48 PM

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline joan1984

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Reply #1594 on: August 31, 2020, 09:00:07 PM
  I hope by bumping my actual full post, it will be obvious that I never said Mr. Ngo commented specifically about the 'church' U-Haul you reported... however, it seemed similar to what Mr. Ngo DID report about, which was the 'RiotKitchen' vans and Bus that were seized outside Kenosha, WI.

  I speculated that the group you reported about may have similarly been seized.
You selected a small portion of my post, and applied it as though I had said it about
your church group and their van/drivers, and demanded references...

  You removed selectively my comment from context, effectively 'quoting' something that was not said about your missing Van, then critiqued that 'strawman', whether you did it intentionally, or by accident.

Just want to set it straight. Move along now, nothing to see here...


  Hmmm, I expect U-Haul knows where their van is, within a Meter of two.

The 'church' did not expect the edible supplies to be returned to them, when they happily loaded the van, with two 'unknown' to them drivers, with hopes their 'donation' would keep the Kenosha BLM/Biden Mob going for a while, in violation of the orders of the Governor, and the presence of many National Guard members there to enforce 'peace'...

Likely/perhaps, the van is at the same location as the Black School Bus, the Black Laundry Truck, and the SUV that were captured at a remote location on the way to Kenosha, WI, where there were 9 or more arrests of the occupants yesterday.

During the arrest, LE had to pry open the SUV... The vehicles were carrying, in addition to the persons arrested, a cache of illegal fireworks, gas masks, protective vests, weapons, and suspected controlled substances.

   Andy Kno, who reports on such things, credited the raided/seized persons and vehicles to "Riot Kitchen", a West Coast group that is known to supply rioters for left wing causes, "demonstrators" would be the leftist description of such persons.

  If not a part of the same outfit as your missing van of 'church supplies', likely the same law enforcement outfit that got one, got them all.

  I hope the Law Enforcement folks put the snacks and fire extinguishers to good use.  

#Blue Lives Matter


Some people are like the 'slinky'. Not really good for much, but they bring a smile to your face as they fall down stairs.


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1595 on: August 31, 2020, 09:12:37 PM
You have a long history of obfuscating, gaslighting, lying, misleading, telling half-truths, complete falsehoods and engaging hypocrisy.

Asking you to cite credible sources rather than rhetoric and editorializing is not unreasonable if you choose not to do these things.

I am not sorry I interrupted your racist and Trumpist bafflegab postings by demanding you deal in good faith.

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

P.S. You still have yet to provide the specific post regarding Mr. Ngo.

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


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Reply #1596 on: September 01, 2020, 03:47:08 PM
why do democrats who fought to keep slavery still to this day keep creating racial divisions in our country?
everyone including our present day president has tried their best to improve the lives of african americans and hispanics and asians and worked hard to overcome the struggles our country has had with ignorance in the past.
cant we all work together to try to put this behind us as we move forward?
why oh why do democrats year after year after year keep throwing race in the face of black people? african americans are well aware of the progress this country has made and the shortcoming we all need to work thru that remain,THEY  DONT NEED DEMOCRAT POLITICIANS TO TELL THEM OVER AND OVER...year after year day after day.. the continual hate and race baiting and all the damage it brings with it needs to stop.
CNN dumps race hate on peoples ears and brains 24 hours a day! just because they think it helps democrats--- its crazy.
we are all americans, thats the MEANING of american...its a damn melting pot!
LET PEOPLE MELT !

"The era of Gaslighting"


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1597 on: September 01, 2020, 04:16:57 PM
Milwaukee Bucks assistant coach slams Jared Kushner for ‘ignorance’ on NBA activism

Quote
Milwaukee Bucks assistant coach Vin Baker said Tuesday that White House senior adviser Jared Kushner showed a “level of ignorance” with his remarks about NBA players’ refusal to take the court after the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wis.

“There’s no sensitivity there,” Baker told POLITICO Playbook authors Anna Palmer and Jake Sherman. “I don’t obviously agree with the comment. There’s a level of ignorance there.”

The Bucks, whose home arena in downtown Milwaukee is 40 miles north of Kenosha, sparked a wave of protests across the sports world after the team declined to participate in a playoff game last Wednesday against the Orlando Magic.

The NBA subsequently postponed its three playoff games scheduled to take place that day as players around the league also refused to take the court in protest against racial injustice and police brutality.

Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, was dismissive of the players’ actions in an interview last Thursday with CNBC.

“Look, I think that the NBA players are very fortunate that they have the financial position where they’re able to take a night off from work without having to have the consequences to themselves financially,” Kushner said. “So they have that luxury, which is great.”

Kushner said that “there’s a lot of activism” within the NBA and that the league had “put a lot of slogans out,” but argued that “what we need to do is turn that from slogans and signals to actual action that’s going to solve the problem.”

Trump has also been intensely critical of the NBA, calling the league “highly political” in a tweet Tuesday morning.

“Basketball ratings are WAY down, and they won’t be coming back,” he wrote. “I hope football and baseball are watching and learning because the same thing will be happening to them. Stand tall for our Country and our Flag!!!”

Bucks senior vice president Alex Lasry told POLITICO on Tuesday that the White House had not reached out to the team, and he described Kushner’s comments as a “little ironic, coming from him.”

“This wasn’t anyone taking a night off and then just going back to their hotel room being like, ‘Eh … I just didn’t want to play today,” Lasry said.

“This was a statement. And this was an act to say, ‘Hey, enough is enough, and if you guys aren’t going to take this seriously, then we’re going to have to do something to bring this to the forefront again and hopefully force people to act.”

#BlackLivesMatter

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Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

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Reply #1598 on: September 01, 2020, 05:04:48 PM
( :

"The era of Gaslighting"


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I think you are mistakenly insulting half of the entire country with your not too well thought out statement.. i am not racist and i support our president, i was not a racist when i supported obama either. i doubt there are really too many racists still alive in america. maybe your anger is caused by a bad experience in your past or the media is making things seem worse than they really are in your perspective.

"The era of Gaslighting"


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1600 on: September 01, 2020, 05:39:46 PM
I think you are mistakenly insulting half of the entire country with your not too well thought out statement.. i am not racist and i support our president, i was not a racist when i supported obama either. i doubt there are really too many racists still alive in america. maybe your anger is caused by a bad experience in your past or the media is making things seem worse than they really are in your perspective.



#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1601 on: September 01, 2020, 05:43:48 PM
ON WITNESS AND RESPAIR: A PERSONAL TRAGEDY FOLLOWED BY PANDEMIC

Quote
My Beloved died in January. He was a foot taller than me and had large, beautiful dark eyes and dexterous, kind hands. He fixed me breakfast and pots of loose-leaf tea every morning. He cried at both of our children’s births, silently, tears glazing his face. Before I drove our children to school in the pale dawn light, he would put both hands on the top of his head and dance in the driveway to make the kids laugh. He was funny, quick-witted, and could inspire the kind of laughter that cramped my whole torso. Last fall, he decided it would be best for him and our family if he went back to school. His primary job in our household was to shore us up, to take care of the children, to be a househusband. He traveled with me often on business trips, carried our children in the back of lecture halls, watchful and quietly proud as I spoke to audiences, as I met readers and shook hands and signed books. He indulged my penchant for Christmas movies, for meandering trips through museums, even though he would have much preferred to be in a stadium somewhere, watching football. One of my favorite places in the world was beside him, under his warm arm, the color of deep, dark river water.

In early January, we became ill with what we thought was flu. Five days into our illness, we went to a local urgent care center, where the doctor swabbed us and listened to our chests. The kids and I were diagnosed with flu; my Beloved’s test was inconclusive. At home, I doled out medicine to all of us: Tamiflu and Promethazine. My children and I immediately began to feel better, but my Beloved did not. He burned with fever. He slept and woke to complain that he thought the medicine wasn’t working, that he was in pain. And then he took more medicine and slept again.

Two days after our family doctor visit, I walked into my son’s room where my Beloved lay, and he panted: Can’t. Breathe. I brought him to the emergency room, where after an hour in the waiting room, he was sedated and put on a ventilator. His organs failed: first his kidneys, then his liver. He had a massive infection in his lungs, developed sepsis, and in the end, his great strong heart could no longer support a body that had turned on him. He coded eight times. I witnessed the doctors perform CPR and bring him back four. Within 15 hours of walking into the emergency room of that hospital, he was dead. The official reason: acute respiratory distress syndrome. He was 33 years old.

Without his hold to drape around my shoulders, to shore me up, I sank into hot, wordless grief.

Two months later, I squinted at a video of a gleeful Cardi B chanting in a singsong voice: Coronavirus, she cackled. Coronavirus. I stayed silent while people around me made jokes about COVID, rolled their eyes at the threat of pandemic. Weeks later, my kids’ school was closed. Universities were telling students to vacate the dorms while professors were scrambling to move classes online. There was no bleach, no toilet paper, no paper towels for purchase anywhere. I snagged the last of the disinfectant spray off a pharmacy shelf; the clerk ringing up my purchases asking me wistfully: Where did you find that at, and for one moment, I thought she would challenge me for it, tell me there was some policy in place to prevent my buying it.

Days became weeks, and the weather was strange for south Mississippi, for the swampy, water-ridden part of the state I call home: low humidity, cool temperatures, clear, sun-lanced skies. My children and I awoke at noon to complete homeschooling lessons. As the spring days lengthened into summer, my children ran wild, exploring the forest around my house, picking blackberries, riding bikes and four-wheelers in their underwear. They clung to me, rubbed their faces into my stomach, and cried hysterically: I miss Daddy, they said. Their hair grew tangled and dense. I didn’t eat, except when I did, and then it was tortillas, queso, and tequila.

The absence of my Beloved echoed in every room of our house. Him folding me and the children in his arms on our monstrous fake-suede sofa. Him shredding chicken for enchiladas in the kitchen. Him holding our daughter by the hands and pulling her upwards, higher and higher, so she floated at the top of her leap in a long bed-jumping marathon. Him shaving the walls of the children’s playroom with a sander after an internet recipe for homemade chalkboard paint went wrong: green dust everywhere.

During the pandemic, I couldn’t bring myself to leave the house, terrified I would find myself standing in the doorway of an ICU room, watching the doctors press their whole weight on the chest of my mother, my sisters, my children, terrified of the lurch of their feet, the lurch that accompanies each press that restarts the heart, the jerk of their pale, tender soles, terrified of the frantic prayer without intention that keens through the mind, the prayer for life that one says in the doorway, the prayer I never want to say again, the prayer that dissolves midair when the hush-click-hush-click of the ventilator drowns it, terrified of the terrible commitment at the heart of me that reasons that if the person I love has to endure this, then the least I can do is stand there, the least I can do is witness, the least I can do is tell them over and over again, aloud, I love you. We love you. We ain’t going nowhere.

As the pandemic settled in and stretched, I set my alarms to wake early, and on mornings after nights where I actually slept, I woke and worked on my novel in progress. The novel is about a woman who is even more intimately acquainted with grief than I am, an enslaved woman whose mother is stolen from her and sold south to New Orleans, whose lover is stolen from her and sold south, who herself is sold south and descends into the hell of chattel slavery in the mid-1800s. My loss was a tender second skin. I shrugged against it as I wrote, haltingly, about this woman who speaks to spirits and fights her way across rivers.

My commitment surprised me. Even in a pandemic, even in grief, I found myself commanded to amplify the voices of the dead that sing to me, from their boat to my boat, on the sea of time. On most days, I wrote one sentence. On some days, I wrote 1,000 words. Many days, it and I seemed useless. All of it, misguided endeavor. My grief bloomed as depression, just as it had after my brother died at 19, and I saw little sense, little purpose in this work, this solitary vocation. Me, sightless, wandering the wild, head thrown back, mouth wide open, singing to a star-drenched sky. Like all the speaking, singing women of old, a maligned figure in the wilderness. Few listened in the night.

What resonated back to me: the emptiness between the stars. Dark matter. Cold.

Did you see it? My cousin asked me.

No. I couldn’t bring myself to watch it, I said. Her words began to flicker, to fade in and out. Grief sometimes makes it hard for me to hear. Sound came in snatches.

His knee, she said.

On his neck, she said.

Couldn’t breathe, she said.

He cried for his mama, she said.

I read about Ahmaud, I said. I read about Breonna.

I don’t say, but I thought it: I know their beloveds’ wail. I know their beloveds’ wail. I know their beloveds wander their pandemic rooms, pass through their sudden ghosts. I know their loss burns their beloveds’ throats like acid. Their families will speak, I thought. Ask for justice. And no one will answer, I thought. I know this story: Trayvon, Tamir, Sandra.

Cuz, I said, I think you told me this story before.

I think I wrote it.

I swallowed sour.

In the days after my conversation with my cousin, I woke to people in the streets. I woke to Minneapolis burning. I woke to protests in America’s heartland, Black people blocking the highways. I woke to people doing the haka in New Zealand. I woke to hoodie-wearing teens, to John Boyega raising a fist in the air in London, even as he was afraid he would sink his career, but still, he raised his fist. I woke to droves of people, masses of people in Paris, sidewalk to sidewalk, moving like a river down the boulevards. I knew the Mississippi. I knew the plantations on its shores, the movement of enslaved and cotton up and down its eddies. The people marched, and I had never known that there could be rivers such as this, and as protesters chanted and stomped, as they grimaced and shouted and groaned, tears burned my eyes. They glazed my face.

I sat in my stuffy pandemic bedroom and thought I might never stop crying. The revelation that Black Americans were not alone in this, that others around the world believed that Black Lives Matter broke something in me, some immutable belief I’d carried with me my whole life. This belief beat like another heart—thump—in my chest from the moment I took my first breath as an underweight, two-pound infant after my mother, ravaged by stress, delivered me at 24 weeks. It beat from the moment the doctor told my Black mother her Black baby would die. Thump.

That belief was infused with fresh blood during the girlhood I’d spent in underfunded public school classrooms, cavities eating away at my teeth from government-issued block cheese, powdered milk, and corn flakes. Thump. Fresh blood in the moment I heard the story of how a group of white men, revenue agents, had shot and killed my great-great-grandfather, left him to bleed to death in the woods like an animal, from the second I learned no one was ever held accountable for his death. Thump. Fresh blood in the moment I found out the white drunk driver who killed my brother wouldn’t be charged for my brother’s death, only for leaving the scene of the car accident, the scene of the crime. Thump.

This is the belief that America fed fresh blood into for centuries, this belief that Black lives have the same value as a plow horse or a grizzled donkey. I knew this. My family knew this. My people knew this, and we fought it, but we were convinced we would fight this reality alone, fight until we could no more, until we were in the ground, bones moldering, headstones overgrown above in the world where our children and children’s children still fought, still yanked against the noose, the forearm, the starvation and redlining and rape and enslavement and murder and choked out: I can’t breathe. They would say: I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe.

I cried in wonder each time I saw protest around the world because I recognized the people. I recognized the way they zip their hoodies, the way they raised their fists, the way they walked, the way they shouted. I recognized their action for what it was: witness. Even now, each day, they witness.

They witness injustice.

They witness this America, this country that gaslit us for 400 fucking years.

Witness that my state, Mississippi, waited until 2013 to ratify the 13th Amendment.

Witness that Mississippi didn’t remove the Confederate battle emblem from its state flag until 2020.

Witness Black people, Indigenous people, so many poor brown people, lying on beds in frigid hospitals, gasping our last breaths with COVID-riddled lungs, rendered flat by undiagnosed underlying conditions, triggered by years of food deserts, stress, and poverty, lives spent snatching sweets so we could eat one delicious morsel, savor some sugar on the tongue, oh Lord, because the flavor of our lives is so often bitter.

They witness our fight too, the quick jerk of our feet, see our hearts lurch to beat again in our art and music and work and joy. How revelatory that others witness our battles and stand up. They go out in the middle of a pandemic, and they march.

I sob, and the rivers of people run in the streets.

When my Beloved died, a doctor told me: The last sense to go is hearing. When someone is dying, they lose sight and smell and taste and touch. They even forget who they are. But in the end, they hear you.

I hear you.

I hear you.

You say:

I love you.

We love you.

We ain’t going nowhere.

I hear you say:

We here.

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline eater

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Reply #1602 on: September 01, 2020, 05:53:24 PM
sorry for your loss of a loved one from covid, i lost my mother to it too.
all lives matter to those who loved them.

"The era of Gaslighting"


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1603 on: September 01, 2020, 05:59:29 PM


#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB


#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB


Offline Athos_131

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Reply #1604 on: September 07, 2020, 02:13:00 AM
Trump orders crackdown on federal antiracism training, calling it 'anti-American'

Quote
Donald Trump has directed the Office of Management and Budget to crack down on federal agencies’ antiracism training sessions, calling them “divisive, anti-American propaganda”.

The OMB director, Russell Vought, in a letter Friday to executive branch agencies, directed them to identify spending related to any training on “critical race theory”, “white privilege” or any other material that teaches or suggests that the United States or any race or ethnicity is “inherently racist or evil”.

The memo comes as the nation has faced a reckoning this summer over racial injustice in policing and other spheres of American life. Trump has spent much of the summer defending the display of the Confederate battle flag and monuments of civil war rebels from protesters seeking their removal, in what he has called a “culture war” ahead of the 3 November election.

Meanwhile, he has rejected comments from the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, and others that there is “systemic racism” in policing and American culture that must be addressed.

How did the US's mainstream right end up openly supporting vigilante terror?
Richard Seymour
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Vought’s memo cites “press reports” as contributing to Trump’s decision, apparently referring to segments on Fox News and other outlets that have stoked conservative outrage about the federal training.

Vought’s memo says additional federal guidance on training sessions is forthcoming, maintaining that “the President, and his Administration, are fully committed to the fair and equal treatment of all individuals in the United States”.

“The President has a proven track record of standing for those whose voice has long been ignored and who have failed to benefit from all our country has to offer, and he intends to continue to support all Americans, regardless of race, religion, or creed,” he added. “The divisive, false, and demeaning propaganda of the critical race theory movement is contrary to all we stand for as Americans and should have no place in the Federal government.”

#BlackLivesMatter

#BanTheNaziFromKB

#BlackLivesMatter
Arrest The Cops Who Killed Breonna Taylor

#BanTheNaziFromKB