KRISTEN'S BOARD

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
Pages: 1 ... 73 74 75 76 77 [78]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Coronavirus, The plague has arrived  (Read 9328 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ToeinH2O
Ph.D in Perversity
Global Moderator
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 687
Offline Offline

Posts: 7,187


Member since '08, MJ's inamorato, POY 2013, POM x3


« Reply #1155 on: July 29, 2020, 08:56:00 PM »


More people of Walmart... can’t even mask right.



Great granddaughter of anti-Nazi resistance fighter confronted a couple wearing swastika masks in a US Walmart
Logged
MintJulie
Version 9.6
Super Freak
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 692
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,685


Madame Sheriff


« Reply #1156 on: July 29, 2020, 08:59:53 PM »


And we had some confederate flag mask wearing people at a Walmart near us a week ago.
Logged

watcher1
Burnt at the stake
*******

Fame 831
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 14,080


Gentleman Pervert


« Reply #1157 on: July 30, 2020, 03:31:32 PM »


And we had some confederate flag mask wearing people at a Walmart near us a week ago.

Talk about people stuck in the past. And oblivious to history. Unbelievable.
Logged

A naughty thought is a terrible thing to waste
Lois
Super Freak
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 648
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,893



« Reply #1158 on: July 31, 2020, 08:15:17 AM »

Herman Cain died of COVID-19.  He is belived to have caught it at Trump's Tulsa Rally.
Logged

Lois
Super Freak
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 648
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,893



« Reply #1159 on: July 31, 2020, 09:58:10 PM »

Today a development was reported that is truely alarming: https://news.yahoo.com/hospitals-told-send-coronavirus-data-064649924.html

In short, hospitals are no longer to report positive tests, hospitalizations or deaths to the CDC, but directly to the Trump Administration via the Dept of Health and Human Services.

Why is this alarming?  Because the CDC must publish its findings pursuant to its charter and the law; the department of Health and Human Services does not.

I believe this is being done to hide the scope of the pandamic from the American people.  That way Trump can boast theat the virus has just "disapeared" and it will be harder to prove the lie.

BREAKING ON CBS NEWS: The Trump administration paid 2.5 million for software needed to track COVID infections/deaths/hospitaliztions, etc. after moving this responsibility from the CDC and giving the task to the Dept of Health and Human Services.  How the company was awarded the bid is suspect, and data is being lost.

I'll keep my eyes open for more details and sources.
Logged

joan1984
Burnt at the stake
*******

Fame 316
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 11,053


Co-POY 2011


« Reply #1160 on: July 31, 2020, 11:53:53 PM »

  Center for Disease Control and prevention reports to Health and Human Services, which is a Cabinet Level Agency within the Executive Administration.

  Hospitals reporting directly to CDC has been questioned as to being complete ad accurate, and the resulting CDC reports have caused some confusion, where Media reporting of CDC vs. HHS data shows some conflicts. All the data goes to HHS, now, and CDC continues it's required reporting, with data in common now.

  Communication will be uniform, more consistent, via Executive Administration is the goal. The CDC does not issue reports to cover all the data collected, and now this situation may be better displayed for all to see.
Logged

Some people are like the 'slinky'. Not really good for much, but they bring a smile to your face as they fall down stairs.
ChirpingGirl
Burnt at the stake
*******

Fame 442
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 11,043



« Reply #1161 on: August 01, 2020, 04:09:56 AM »

But, those masks they charge $7.99 each for are supposed to stop it. Right, Mr. Prickster?  Roll Eyes I thought we were flattening the curve.

Illinois has put 11 counties at ‘warning level’ for coronavirus resurgence.

https://www.pantagraph.com/news/state-and-regional/watch-now-illinois-has-put-11-counties-at-warning-level-for-coronavirus-resurgence-heres-where/article_3124ac4c-5f3b-53cd-8c96-d3097aded8b7.html


But everyone's already doing that, so what's the real reason you wanna shut us down again and put CJ out of work again?  Roll Eyes

Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) has put LaSalle County on its warning list for #covid19 spread. Health department officials have identified multiple sources of spread, including at Walmart, house parties and workplaces. Each of us has to take responsibility to slow the spread and keep each other safe.

Here's what you can do:
Wear a mask everywhere you go in public
Don't enter a bar or restaurant or any enclosed space if it looks crowded
Keep 6 feet of physical distance
We can beat this virus, but only if we're #AllInIllinois.
Logged

What in cousin-fuckin’ tarnation Alabama Betty Crocker Miss fuckin' Betty White shit is this?
Lois
Super Freak
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 648
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,893



« Reply #1162 on: August 02, 2020, 04:40:00 AM »

From NPR:

COVID-19 Hospital Data System That Bypasses CDC Plagued By Delays, Inaccuracies

Earlier this month, when the Trump administration told hospitals to send crucial data about coronavirus cases and intensive care capacity to a new online system, it promised the change would be worth it. The data would be more complete and transparent and an improvement over the old platform run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, administration officials said.

Instead, the public data hub created under the new system is updated erratically and is rife with inconsistencies and errors, data analysts say.

Lawmakers planned to grill members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force about the reporting change and what is being done to ensure the data remains public and reliable, in a Friday morning hearing of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus. Several House subcommittees have already launched an investigation into the data change.

The delays and problems with data on the availability of beds, ventilators and safety equipment could have profound consequences as infections and deaths soar throughout most of the country, public health experts say.

"If the information is not accurate, it could cost time — and lives," says Lisa M. Lee, formerly the chief science officer for public health surveillance at CDC. She is now at Virginia Tech. For instance, knowing which hospitals have the capacity to take on new patients is critical, she explains. "If all the ICU beds are taken up, emergency medical personnel need to take [new patients] to the next town over or to the next county."

The Department of Health and Human Services is standing by its decision. While some hospital associations and states have had "difficulty," HHS has worked to quickly resolve errors, and they "are pleased with the progress we have made during this transition and the actionable data it is providing," a spokesperson wrote to NPR in a statement.

Hospitals report to an untested contractor

When infection numbers start to rise in a state, public health officials and residents worry about whether there are enough hospital beds for seriously ill patients. An area's hospital capacity is an estimate, fed by the data that individual hospitals report. Public health officials rely on the estimates to see whether hospitals are at risk of being overwhelmed.

Hospitals are supposed to report daily to the federal government how many beds they have, the number occupied and the availability of intensive care beds. Under the new system, the Department of Health and Human Services aggregates the information at a state level and shares a daily spreadsheet of the information that has been reported — gaps and all.

But the old CDC approach interpreted the data a step further. CDC posted estimates derived from the data to show an approximation of the actual availability of ICU beds, accounting for the lags and gaps in reporting. These estimates — promised on the HHS website — have not been updated in over a week.

By contrast, the CDC estimates was updated three times a week. And while the data sent to CDC was vetted for accuracy before being posted publicly, the data sent to the new platform appears to be posted as it is received and contains multiple anomalies, analysts note.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, hospitals have been reporting bed capacity and other key data to CDC through its National Healthcare Safety Network COVID-19 module. No hospital staff interviewed by NPR described problems with this system. They said that it had been used by hospitals for 15 years to monitor the impact of other illnesses and that staff are comfortable with it.

The established system was disrupted by a memo dated July 10, issued to hospitals by HHS. In the memo, HHS took the unusual step of instructing hospitals to stop reporting the capacity data to CDC and to instead use a reporting platform developed recently by private contractor TeleTracking. As NPR has reported, the details of how the contract was awarded to TeleTracking are unclear.

Hospitals received only a few days notice of the change and scrambled to adapt.

The sudden reporting switch to HHS, bypassing CDC, prompted an immediate outcry. Public health groups objected to the change as unnecessary and burdensome for hospitals in the midst of a pandemic. Open government organizations demanded that HHS rescind its guidance and return control of the data to CDC. On Tuesday, 22 state attorneys general added to the chorus of those demanding that HHS reverse course.

Michael Caputo, HHS assistant secretary for public affairs, framed the switch at the time in a statement to NPR as a technology upgrade from "the CDC's old data gathering operation," which "just cannot keep up with this pandemic."

"The new faster and complete data system is what our nation needs to defeat the coronavirus," Caputo wrote.

The promise of better data, unfulfilled

The data now available to the public appears to be neither faster nor more complete.

When HHS took over the collection and reporting of this hospital capacity data, it promised to update "multiple times each day." Later, the agency walked that back to say it would be updated daily.

Those daily updates have yet to materialize. On Thursday, an HHS spokesperson told NPR via email, "We will be updating the site to make it clear that the estimates are only updated weekly."

The HHS Protect Public Data Hub, the public-facing website set up by HHS, offers three items as a "Hospital Utilization Snapshot," all of which have data that is over a week old.

A "Downloadable Dataset" estimating how many hospital beds are occupied by state — last updated on July 21.
A table tallying the total number of hospital beds occupied across the country, which has not been updated since July 23.
A map showing the percent of hospital beds occupied by state, which has not been updated since July 23.
Still, hospitals are required to report this data daily to TeleTracking, either directly or via their state health department. Failure to do so could affect the state's access to remdesivir, one of the few drugs that has shown promise in treating severe COVID-19 cases, according to the HHS guidance to hospitals and the American Hospital Association.

Ryan Panchadsaram, co-founder of the tracking website CovidExitStrategy.org, expressed frustration over the delays in a tweet: "2 weeks since the switch from @HHSGov to @CDCgov...Daily updates never happened... 29 states see increased hospitalizations & this critical indicator is still missing."

Moving the goal posts?

The only information about hospital capacity that appears to be updated regularly on the HHS Protect site is the percentage of hospitals that have submitted data in the past seven days.

HHS's Caputo wrote in a statement to NPR in mid-July that CDC's voluntary reporting system "provided data from only 85 percent of hospitals; the President's COVID response requires 100 percent to report."

The new dataset does not show 100% compliance. According to the dataset posted on July 30, 92% of hospitals have reported some information to HHS in the past week, ranging from 75% in Delaware to 100% in eight states, including Nevada, Iowa, and Minnesota.

Asked about compliance, an HHS spokesperson told NPR Thursday, "The consistency is improving, and we are proud of the progress that has been made."

But the higher level of compliance is not the whole picture, according to a CDC official familiar with the former reporting system. The tallies do not include certain categories of hospitals, including rehabilitation or veterans' hospitals, which have suffered COVID-19 outbreaks. These rehabilitation and veterans' hospitals had previously been included in the data reported by CDC, says the official, who spoke to NPR on background because they were not authorized to speak on the record.

"It's not unusual to split out categories of hospitals and only focus on the subset of acute care hospitals," says Thomas Tsai, an assistant professor of health policy and management at Harvard University. Tsai pointed out that general hospitals care for the bulk of COVID-19 cases, and patients in alternate systems like military and veterans hospitals access COVID-19 care differently than the broader population.

Still, omitting these hospitals from the count means better compliance with the data mandate can be attained with fewer hospitals reporting.

"These hospitals are not on our list of priority hospitals that we are seeking daily information from because they treat very few, if any, COVID-19 patients," an HHS spokesperson explained in response to questions about the omitted facilities.

Anomalies and inconsistencies

After the data reporting switch, unusual numbers started cropping up in data that show how many hospital beds are filled in a given state, data analysts say. In some states, the bed occupancy rates soared, even though the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients dropped or only increased modestly.

Take, for example, Arizona. Under the old system, in data last collected by CDC on July 14, an estimated 3,205 COVID-19 patients in Arizona occupied 24% of the state's inpatient hospital beds. After the switch to the new HHS reporting system, an analogous dataset posted by HHS showed 82 fewer COVID-19 patients hospitalized, but the bed occupancy rate had jumped to 42%. It's unclear how fewer patients could be occupying more hospital capacity.

There are similar anomalies in the data for other states, including Georgia and New Mexico.

In Colorado, the hospitalization data maintained by HHS conflicts with the state's data posted to a daily dashboard. As of July 30, the state dashboard lists 341 patients hospitalized in Colorado with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases. A dataset maintained by the HHS, updated on July 30, lists 491 patients in Colorado.

"There's either a difference in how we're accounting or there's a difference in how we're reporting," Dr. Stephen Cantrill, an emergency physician at Denver Health, a health care system in Colorado. "Is this a systemic issue or is this just a one-state issue?"

Cantrill says he has been hearing about data inconsistencies from colleagues in other states.

COVID-19 tracking websites that had relied on the data collected and reported by CDC have also found anomalies. In a post, members of The COVID Tracking Project from The Atlantic describe the hospital capacity data as being "highly erratic in recent weeks," and noted that data has been missing or incomplete from many states, including California, Texas, South Carolina, Idaho, Missouri and Wyoming, because of complications related to switching reporting systems.

An agency spokesperson acknowledged that some facilities have had trouble making that switch, suggesting that this is the cause of the data anomalies. "When HHS identifies errors in the data submissions, we work directly with the state or hospital association to quickly resolve them," an agency spokesperson wrote to NPR. "The goal of full transparency is to acknowledge when we find discrepancies in the data and correct them."

The organizers of the tracking website COVID Exit Strategy initially found the data provided by HHS Protect to be unusable. "It had some states like Rhode Island having an inpatient bed utilization of above 100%," says site co-founder Ryan Panchadsaram. "And Rhode Island is a state where hospitalizations are quite low for COVID."

The site stopped pulling hospital capacity data from HHS Protect for several days but resumed the reporting on July 30, using a dataset from HealthData.gov with a "user beware" warning that reads in part: "For the time being, we recommend cross-checking these numbers with the ones reported on a state's official website to get an accurate picture."

"Everyone can see where the inconsistencies are," says Panchadsaram. "The public can see it. The states can see it. The federal government can see it."

"We're sort of stuck in this moment where it's like a lot of debugging and a lot of aligning of data is happening," he says. He's hoping, though, that the issues will be resolved soon.

Logged

Lois
Super Freak
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 648
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,893



« Reply #1163 on: August 02, 2020, 04:53:07 AM »

Also from NPR:

Irregularities In COVID Reporting Contract Award Process Raise New Questions

An NPR investigation has found irregularities in the process by which the Trump administration awarded a multi-million dollar contract to a Pittsburgh company to collect key data about COVID-19 from the country's hospitals.

The contract is at the center of a controversy over the administration's decision to move that data reporting function from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — which has tracked infection information for a range of illnesses for years — to the Department of Health and Human Services.

TeleTracking Technologies, the company that won the contract, has traditionally focused on creating software for hospitals to track patient status. And there are questions about how it came to be responsible for gathering data in the midst of a pandemic.

Among the findings of the NPR investigation:

The Department of Health and Human Services initially characterized the contract with TeleTracking as a no-bid contract. When asked about that, HHS said there was a "coding error" and that the contract was actually competitively bid.

The process by which HHS awarded the contract is normally used for innovative scientific research, not the building of government databases.
HHS had directly phoned the company about the contract, according to a company spokesperson.
 
TeleTracking CEO Michael Zamagias had links to the New York real estate world — and in particular, a firm that financed billions of dollars in projects with the Trump Organization.

An abrupt change during the pandemic

When the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC, sent out a directive to the nation's hospitals in April announcing it would be using TeleTracking as an option to collect COVID data, Carrie Kroll didn't give it a second thought.

It just seemed like one more form hospitals might need to fill out.

Kroll is with the Texas Hospital Association, and balked only after the HHS suddenly announced in July that hospitals could no longer report COVID data through the CDC, but would instead be required to do so through the HHS-TeleTracking system or their state health departments.

This is the sort of data that has been closely watched since the outbreak of the pandemic: from beds, to personal protective equipment (PPE), to detailed demographic information on suspected and confirmed COVID patients.

"Up until the switch, we were reporting about 70 elements and we're now at 129," Kroll said, scrolling through a five-page list of the information now required. "I mean, clearly we're in the middle of a pandemic, right? I mean this isn't the type of stuff you try to do in the middle of a pandemic."

Hospitals were only given days to start sending all this information to TeleTracking. The HHS explained the sudden change by claiming the new database would streamline information gathering and help in the allocation of therapeutic pharmaceuticals like remdesivir.

But thousands of hospitals had used the CDC system for years to report infection control data. So it raised questions: Why the change? Why now?

The CDC has been tracking these numbers for some 15 years. And while its system isn't perfect — it requires all the information to be entered manually, for example — it is unclear why the government, already underwater with the spread of COVID, didn't decide instead to tinker with the existing system.

Robert Redfield, the CDC's director, said the reason HHS chose TeleTracking was because it provided "rapid ways to update the type of data that we're collecting" and that it "reduces the reporting burden," none of which, given the duplication of Kroll's experience around the country, seems to be happening.

The TeleTracking software, for example, requires all the data to be keyed in manually, just like the CDC once did.

An HHS spokesperson said that the COVID response required that they move quickly to implement a new system, "even when more time might be desired. We acknowledge that hospitals were not given significant lead time to prepare for these changes."

TeleTracking's ties to Trump Organization financiers

The CEO of the company, Michael Zamagias, came from the real estate sector. He founded Zamagias Properties, a real estate investment and development company, in Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1987.

The company went on to develop iconic office buildings, shopping centers and malls in Pittsburgh and Virginia, and its success helped Zamagias become a fixture outside Pittsburgh and, in particular, in the New York real estate scene.

Zamagias is a longtime Republican donor and community philanthropist, giving generously to Pittsburgh schools and youth programs.

One of the young people who came to Zamagias for advice and counsel was a New Yorker named Neal Cooper, though he was hardly new to business or real estate. Zamagias became the young Cooper's mentor. He gave Cooper an internship.

Neal's father, Howard, was the named partner in a Manhattan company called Cooper-Horowitz, one of the largest privately held real estate debt and equity firms in the country.

"Cooper did business with Michael in the late 1980s," Neal Cooper told NPR, referring to his dad's company. "I don't know if we ever did big deals with him, but we ran in the same circles. I learned a lot from Michael. He was always one or two steps ahead of the next guy."

Cooper-Horowitz handles debt and equity in all classes of real estate and specializes in the hospitality industry.

And in that vein, it did billions of dollars of work with the Trump Organization on projects like the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago.

"I didn't handle Trump's account, but I've been in meetings with Trump," Cooper said. "We did tons of business with him, billions of dollars of business."

And there are other suggestions of a close relationship between Cooper-Horowitz and the Trumps.

Ivanka Trump has attended a rather famous holiday party the company holds in New York every year. The firm has given to the Trump Foundation. And Richard Horowitz, one of the company's principals, is credited with helping connect the Trump Organization with Deutsche Bank, the German bank that has financed over $2 billion in Trump projects over the past two decades.

There's no evidence that these professional relationships are why Zamagias and TeleTracking received the multi-million dollar contract. Through a spokesperson Zamagias said that he hadn't talked to anyone at Cooper-Horowitz in years, and all his company's contact with the administration came through HHS.

But congressional investigators are now eager to find out if that relationship somehow played a role.

The White House did not respond to questions about whether it was involved in the awarding of the TeleTracking contract, or whether White House staff had any relationship with Zamagias.

An unusual contracting process leads to multi-million dollar TeleTracking deal

Initially, there was confusion about the way HHS awarded the contract to TeleTracking. Public records originally displayed it as a sole-source contract — essentially a no-bid deal.

But after a Senate inquiry and controversy over the mandatory shift to the TeleTracking system, HHS said that there had been a "coding error" and that it had in fact been awarded after a competitive process.

"The TeleTracking contract was part of a competitive solicitation process and was not sole source," an HHS spokesperson said. "One of the websites that tracks federal spending contained an error that incorrectly categorized the award as sole source. That coding error is being corrected."

That competitive process, HHS said, is known as a Broad Agency Announcement.

BAAs are essentially call-outs to private industry to provide innovative solutions to general problems in which a simple straightforward solution may not be available — it isn't meant for something like a government database that replaces an existing CDC function.

A standard government contract would usually lay out a series of specific requirements or specifications. Not so with BAAs. By their very nature, they are less competitive than other types of government contracting processes because they may generate an array of solutions that may not necessarily be comparable.

In a statement, an HHS spokesperson said that the BAA is a "common mechanism... for areas of research interest," and asserted that the healthcare system capacity tracking system previously used by the CDC was "fraught with challenges."

HHS has said that six companies bid for the contract but declines to say who they were or release the evaluations that the department would have done before awarding the contract to TeleTracking.

"Federal acquisition regulations and statutes prohibit us from providing information about other submissions," an HHS spokesperson said. The spokesperson added that the BAA was released in August 2019, and that the agency promoted it on social media, in newsletters, and in emails.

But NPR reached out to more than 20 of TeleTracking's competitors in the fields of hospital workflow management and infection control data and was unable to find a single company that said it had bid on this contract.

One major company told NPR that it hadn't even heard about the HHS announcement.

There is another wrinkle here. A spokesperson for Zamagias told NPR that HHS reached out to the company directly — by phone — because it knew the company from its hurricane and disaster preparedness work.

It is unclear when that phone call was made.

Congressional investigators probe HHS and TeleTracking

The whole process by which TeleTracking got the contract strikes Virginia Canter, chief ethics counsel at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, as out of the ordinary.

It isn't just the use of the BAA. It is that HHS "now requires 6,000 hospitals to enter this data" in what looks like proprietary software, which the federal government may need to pay for in the future, Canter said the current contract ends in September. The Zamagias spokesperson told NPR that TeleTracking hopes for a contract extension — and that potentially means millions of dollars more in the future.

"We do anticipate needing to continue this contract," an HHS spokesperson said.

Congress is also looking into irregularities in the contract process and the decision to shift the data gathering from CDC to HHS. Sen. Patty Murray, a prominent Democrat on health care, first raised questions about the HHS contract in early June.

And Rep. James Clyburn, who chairs a congressional subcommittee overseeing the coronavirus crisis, and House Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney are both demanding answers about what happened.

While the inquiries were originally focused on HHS, Clyburn sent a letter to Zamagias Tuesday asking for information on the contracts, emails and communication exchanged with HHS in a bid to understand how TeleTracking came to land the $10.2 million six-month contract in the middle of a pandemic.

"Your company has previously been awarded a handful of small contracts with the Department of Veteran's Affairs, but your contract with HHS is nearly twenty times larger than all of your previous federal contracts combined," Clyburn wrote in his letter to Zamagias.
Logged

purpleshoes
Deviant
****

Fame 28
Offline Offline

Posts: 267


« Reply #1164 on: August 07, 2020, 01:30:15 PM »

A message for any woman who needs to hear this:

While you struggle through this difficult time, remember two things.

1) You have survived everything that life has thrown at you so far.

2) You can (and will!) do it again.

While I don't know any of you personally, I respect and admire the innate strength and tenacity that women in general are not usually given enough credit for. You are the salt of the earth and I salute you.
Logged
watcher1
Burnt at the stake
*******

Fame 831
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 14,080


Gentleman Pervert


« Reply #1165 on: August 07, 2020, 03:49:18 PM »

Scientists now are saying the virus will never completely go away, even with vaccines. That social distancing, masks and constant hand washing will be pretty much the norm for the foreseeable future. Imagine all the students, from K through college that will be missing almost an entire year of learning! It is especially hard on those youngsters in K - 5th grade that are just learning. Remote learning for them is not the answer.
Logged

A naughty thought is a terrible thing to waste
ToeinH2O
Ph.D in Perversity
Global Moderator
Burnt at the stake
******

Fame 687
Offline Offline

Posts: 7,187


Member since '08, MJ's inamorato, POY 2013, POM x3


« Reply #1166 on: August 07, 2020, 06:27:03 PM »

Scientists now are saying the virus will never completely go away, even with vaccines. That social distancing, masks and constant hand washing will be pretty much the norm for the foreseeable future. Imagine all the students, from K through college that will be missing almost an entire year of learning! It is especially hard on those youngsters in K - 5th grade that are just learning. Remote learning for them is not the answer.

The “flu” is an ancestor of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic, but we have “herd immunity” for the most part now, and many take an annual vaccine.  So that’s been going around for 100 years now. This Coronavirus is just a particularly deadly one, but we’ve seen them before.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 73 74 75 76 77 [78]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: