KRISTEN'S BOARD
KB - It's Cheaper Than Therapy

News:

  • Congratulations to Valley Vixin
    KB's 2020 Erotica Writer of the Year
  • Become a member for access to more areas of our message board, it's free!  Register here.
  • Congratulations to Shiela_M
    KB's 2020 Pervert of the Year

Astronomy

Shiela_M · 1388

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ToeinH2O

  • Ph.D in Perversity
  • Global Moderator
  • Burnt at the stake
  • ******
    • Posts: 9,995
    • Fame +809/-8
  • Member since '08, POY 2013, POM x3
Reply #60 on: February 17, 2020, 09:57:12 PM

It’s sort of like finding out an aging loved one has a terminal disease.


Just don’t say three times...   :emot_laughing:




Offline Jed_

  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 4,313
    • Fame +333/-12
  • I really am a demon that defiles helpless girls
    • Forbidden Forced Fantasy
Reply #61 on: February 18, 2020, 02:26:24 AM
I’m sure he’s fine, LOL.



Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #62 on: February 18, 2020, 06:21:03 AM


Miguel Claro used a Nikon D810A camera with the ISO set to 2500 and a 24-70mm lens set to 26mm at f/2.8. The exposure time was 15 seconds to capture this photo.

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Offline ToeinH2O

  • Ph.D in Perversity
  • Global Moderator
  • Burnt at the stake
  • ******
    • Posts: 9,995
    • Fame +809/-8
  • Member since '08, POY 2013, POM x3
Reply #63 on: February 21, 2020, 02:02:06 PM


Here’s another “let’s have fun with math” opportunity. This galaxy is called UGC 12591. UGC 12591 is 400M light-years away, and it is one big, bad mutha’. It’s four times more massive than our Milky Way. It’s also spinning incredibly fast compared to most galaxies; around 1.1 million miles per hour.
.
How fast is a million miles per hour? I’m glad you asked! That’s about 300 miles per SECOND. Look on a map for a location 300 miles from where you are, then imagine getting there in 1 second. (For comparison, our Milky Way is loping along at around 165 miles per second—roughly half as fast).
.
The Earth rotates on its axis at 1,040 mph*. But if it was rotating as fast as UGC 12591, each “day” would be 83 seconds, rather than 24 hours... and we’d all be flung off into space like fleas off an angry Airedale’s ass.
.
Sooooo...
.
How long does it take for UGC 12591 to rotate just ONCE on its axis at this incredible speed?

250 MILLION YEARS.
.
I told you it was a big sucker.
.
That’s actually about the same as our Milky Way. One rotation is called a Cosmic Year. But since UGC 12591 is 4X more massive and spinning nearly twice as fast, their rotational periods are roughly equal.
.
.
.
*Circumference of earth... 24,901 miles/24 hours



Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #64 on: February 28, 2020, 05:22:37 PM
Nearly every four years, we add an extra day to the calendar in the form of February 29, also known as Leap Day. Put simply, these additional 24 hours are built into the calendar to ensure that it stays in line with the Earth’s movement around the Sun. While the modern calendar contains 365 days, the actual time it takes for Earth to orbit its star is slightly longer—roughly 365.2421 days. The difference might seem negligible, but over decades and centuries that missing quarter of a day per year can add up. To ensure consistency with the true astronomical year, it is necessary to periodically add in an extra day to make up the lost time and get the calendar back in synch with the heavens. 

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Offline msslave

  • Co-POY 2019
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 4,741
    • Fame +500/-1
Reply #65 on: February 28, 2020, 05:33:45 PM
Good job Sheila!  I made a snarky post in the "Good Morning" thread and you manage to get two posts out of that and staying on topic.

Working hard to get yourself into the hot tub maybe,? :emot_laughing:

Well trained and been made compliant....by our two cats.


Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #66 on: February 28, 2020, 05:59:46 PM
Good job Sheila!  I made a snarky post in the "Good Morning" thread and you manage to get two posts out of that and staying on topic.

Working hard to get yourself into the hot tub maybe,? :emot_laughing:

Still have over 150 to go, get what I can
« Last Edit: February 28, 2020, 06:39:13 PM by Shiela_M »

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Online ObiDongKenobi

  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,609
    • Fame +440/-1
Reply #67 on: March 10, 2020, 06:05:51 PM
Nearly every four years, we add an extra day to the calendar in the form of February 29, also known as Leap Day. Put simply, these additional 24 hours are built into the calendar to ensure that it stays in line with the Earth’s movement around the Sun. While the modern calendar contains 365 days, the actual time it takes for Earth to orbit its star is slightly longer—roughly 365.2421 days. The difference might seem negligible, but over decades and centuries that missing quarter of a day per year can add up. To ensure consistency with the true astronomical year, it is necessary to periodically add in an extra day to make up the lost time and get the calendar back in synch with the heavens. 

Adding a day every four years, however, does over compensate by 0.0316 days so an extra day is not added if the year is divisible by 100, this in turn under compensates so a day is added if the year is divisible by 400. 


Princess, would you like to see it light up and hum when I wave it about


Offline ToeinH2O

  • Ph.D in Perversity
  • Global Moderator
  • Burnt at the stake
  • ******
    • Posts: 9,995
    • Fame +809/-8
  • Member since '08, POY 2013, POM x3
Reply #68 on: March 25, 2020, 05:54:50 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2UaFuJsqxk

The Curiosity rover’s extended stay on Mars has proven to be one of NASA’s biggest recent success stories. More than seven years after its arrival at the Bradbury landing site on the Martian surface, Curiosity has just sent back the largest, most detailed panoramic image ever of the Red Planet’s landscape … along with an intriguing new discovery that could yield fresh insights into whether Mars has ever harbored microbial life.

Between Nov. 24 and Dec. 1 of last year, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory captured what the agency describes as the “highest-resolution panorama yet of the Martian surface,” compositing more than 1,000 individual images taken by the telephoto zoom lens on Curiosity’s Mast Camera. The image below is actually the lower-resolution version of the two that NASA has made available; a higher-res version (which omits the rover from the picture, thanks to the extra zoom on the telephoto) is available as 2.43-gigabyte download on the NASA/JPL host page.



NASA also shared a super-informative video highlighting just how much landscape detail the new image contains, zooming in on deep-field features like the rim of the crater that Curiosity calls home; as well as the exposed remnants of the Greenheugh Pediment — “a vast sheet of rock draped over the side of a mountain.”

Early chemical analysis of another Curiosity discovery — the presence in Martian soil of organic compounds called thiophenes — also has researchers speculating that the compounds could suggest that living bacteria once had a foothold on the Red Planet. According to Washington State University astrobiologist Dirk Schulze‑Makuch, part of an international team assessing the data, scientists typically associate thiophenes here on Earth with the breakdown of once-living organisms, though their presence on Mars may have other explanations that can’t yet be ruled out.
“We identified several biological pathways for thiophenes that seem more likely than chemical ones, but we still need proof,” he explained. “If you find thiophenes on Earth, then you would think they are biological, but on Mars, of course, the bar to prove that has to be quite a bit higher.”

Researchers speculate that Mars’ warmer, wetter conditions 3 billion years ago may have harbored the conditions necessary for microbes to thrive, although they say the data are still insufficient to rule out other explanations for the thiophenes’ presence — including chemical reactions from past meteor impacts, or other super-hot events that might have caused the “thermochemical sulfate reduction” process required for the unique compounds to form.

While Curiosity’s data-collecting abilities limit researchers’ ability to pinpoint the still-elusive answer, this year’s scheduled launch of the Rosalind Franklin rover should end up offering more details. The new rover “will be carrying a Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer, or MOMA, which uses a less destructive analyzing method that will allow for the collection of larger molecules,” reports WSU News.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 06:01:14 AM by ToeinH2O »



Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #69 on: April 08, 2020, 05:01:56 PM
I have missed the last 4 super moons because of weather and cloud cover.  It is beginning to seriously anger me.  The super pink moon is supposed to be the closest the moon will get to earth in 2020.  I hate clouds

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Offline purpleshoes

  • Deviant
  • ****
    • Posts: 404
    • Fame +66/-1
Reply #70 on: April 09, 2020, 01:53:13 PM
I have missed the last 4 super moons because of weather and cloud cover.  It is beginning to seriously anger me.  The super pink moon is supposed to be the closest the moon will get to earth in 2020.  I hate clouds

I understand your frustration because I rarely get to see any full moon. Last night though, the sky was so clear and the moon was so bright it was more like twilight. I actually drove about a mile without headlights at about 1am local time. Lest you think I was reckless, it was a country road and there was no other traffic.  ^-^



Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #71 on: April 09, 2020, 02:59:14 PM
I have missed the last 4 super moons because of weather and cloud cover.  It is beginning to seriously anger me.  The super pink moon is supposed to be the closest the moon will get to earth in 2020.  I hate clouds

I understand your frustration because I rarely get to see any full moon. Last night though, the sky was so clear and the moon was so bright it was more like twilight. I actually drove about a mile without headlights at about 1am local time. Lest you think I was reckless, it was a country road and there was no other traffic.  ^-^

Back in highschool my boyfriend used to do that during the winter. Driving down back roads so I could see the moonlight shine off the snow of the untouched fields.  Was so beautiful

I still couldn't see the moon last night though.

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Offline ToeinH2O

  • Ph.D in Perversity
  • Global Moderator
  • Burnt at the stake
  • ******
    • Posts: 9,995
    • Fame +809/-8
  • Member since '08, POY 2013, POM x3
Reply #72 on: April 09, 2020, 10:51:28 PM

I still couldn't see the moon last night though.


In Arizona last night...




Online Shiela_M

  • POY 2020
  • Freakishly Strange
  • ******
    • Posts: 1,894
    • Fame +357/-1
  • As far as I know, I'm freaking delightful
Reply #73 on: April 09, 2020, 11:43:15 PM
rub it in

"I'm a hazard to my health, don't let me get me"


Offline ToeinH2O

  • Ph.D in Perversity
  • Global Moderator
  • Burnt at the stake
  • ******
    • Posts: 9,995
    • Fame +809/-8
  • Member since '08, POY 2013, POM x3
Reply #74 on: April 14, 2020, 07:45:12 AM
Comet with atmosphere FIVE times the size of Jupiter is set to light up the night skies in April - and it could be brighter than Venus

I have observed a really bright object in the northern sky the last two nights.  I assumed it was Venus, but maybe comet Atlas?