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Author Topic: Nobody Told Me What It Was Like To Get Older... Ticked Off Vic  (Read 274 times)
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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2020, 07:26:33 PM »

My parents were early Boomers. I was early Generation X. Ours will probably be the first generation to not have Social Security.
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MissBarbara
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« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2020, 07:51:26 PM »



Either way, it's true that the boomers spent about a decade talking, complaining, singing, and ranting about the state of the country and the world.

Meanwhile, we're actually trying to do something about it.


Hmmm? Let's see?  The boomers marched for civil rights legislation and for that, major civil rights legislation was passed. The boomers protested long and hard to end the Vietnam War, even those boomers who fought in it. I am sure there are a few more noble accomplishments the boomer generation helped bring about. Grin Grin


FYI, the white boomers began matching for civil rights in number after 1964, when the Civil Rights Act was passed. But it's true that they marched in support of the rights that that landmark piece of legislation guaranteed.

While I loathe the whole "ok boomer" thing, it's worth pointing out that boomers in their day complained about the generation gap, and warned us about trusting older people.

Well, the shoe's now on the other foot...




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« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2020, 09:57:06 PM »



Either way, it's true that the boomers spent about a decade talking, complaining, singing, and ranting about the state of the country and the world.

Meanwhile, we're actually trying to do something about it.


Hmmm? Let's see?  The boomers marched for civil rights legislation and for that, major civil rights legislation was passed. The boomers protested long and hard to end the Vietnam War, even those boomers who fought in it. I am sure there are a few more noble accomplishments the boomer generation helped bring about. Grin Grin


FYI, the white boomers began matching for civil rights in number after 1964, when the Civil Rights Act was passed. But it's true that they marched in support of the rights that that landmark piece of legislation guaranteed.

While I loathe the whole "ok boomer" thing, it's worth pointing out that boomers in their day complained about the generation gap, and warned us about trusting older people.

Well, the shoe's now on the other foot...



I kind of remember that we were not to trust anyone over 30. Something like that. Speaking from experience, I think parents who are boomers were less strict with their children then their parents were. And the children of boomers who are now parents are less strict then they were. In some ways, that is good. In other ways, not.
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ToeinH2O
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2020, 06:28:50 PM »

I think parents who are boomers were less strict with their children then their parents were. And the children of boomers who are now parents are less strict then they were. In some ways, that is good. In other ways, not.

My boomer parents turned us loose in the morning, and we weren’t expected to be home until sundown.  I used to run all around town, ride the bus, visit the beach, swim at a local hotel, when I was only 8, 9, and ten.  We had fun.  We also had injuries, fell from trees, broke bones, had stitches.  From age 5 to 15, I had a least one emergency room visit per year, sometimes two or three.   Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

So then these kids of boomers became parents, and WTF?!?!?  HELICOPTER MOMS.  Pretty much a 180° shift.  No unsupervised play, indoors or out.  Irrational fear of strangers and/or kidnapping.  Strollers, play pens, and car seats until the kids are old enough to drive themselves.  Doing the kids’ homework, and then going to campus to argue with the teachers about grades.  What part of “your kid is not exceptional” did you not understand?

I had the police called on me three times in an eight year period in the aughts, for letting my children play outside.  Once a neighbor put my kid in her minivan and drove him home.  Three doors down the street.  I could see her house from mine.  She “just didn’t feel comfortable” letting him walk home by himself.

And now these helicoptered kids, who have trouble making a decision for themselves without calling mom first, are having kids.  And they aren’t better, it seems to be getting worse.  Give it another million years and humans will be marsupials, with a baby pouch and breastfeeding until age ten.  But I rant.
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2020, 11:44:38 PM »

Okay, let's look at this here...

No unsupervised play, indoors or out.
Okay, I grew up outside of town, so indoor and outdoor play were not an issue. That said, I wouldn't be suprised if they were a little paranoid about me playing outside in my early years. And their concerns would be sort of justified, since they lost their oldest son in a drowning accident before I was born.

For me now, as a parent myself, indoor play is supervised by default, since we live in a shoebox. Kids hete also do play outside unsupervised, but why I'm unsure; sure, it's a quiet street, and it has a bad reputation that sort of protects us, but that same reputation also puts us at risk.

Irrational fear of strangers and/or kidnapping.
I wouldn't quite call it irrational. Exaggerated, maybe, at most, but certainly not irrational. Reading that line immediately made me think of the disappearance of the Beaumont children, and many other cases since.

Strollers, play pens, and car seats until the kids are old enough to drive themselves.
Okay, this one does get my goat, and that's because our nice Government made it a law for kids to be in booster seats until they're either seven years old, or 140cm tall! Madness, I tell ya!

Doing the kids’ homework, and then going to campus to argue with the teachers about grades.
Another thing that, as a tutor, gets my goat. But also the flipside gets me too, those who really push their child past the point of sanity to have their kid achieve "the best marks they are capable of" (i.e. straight A's in every subject they tell them to take). Please let your kids be kids!

Now, I'm sorry you had the police called on you for such a trivial thing. In all truthfulness, we are fucking terrified sometimes, when shit gets very real. But we are trying, and generally making good decisions, even if a few of us seem more incompetant than I sometimes make myself out to be. (Long story there...)
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« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2020, 12:21:47 AM »


Now, I'm sorry you had the police called on you for such a trivial thing. In all truthfulness, we are fucking terrified sometimes, when shit gets very real. But we are trying, and generally making good decisions, even if a few of us seem more incompetant than I sometimes make myself out to be. (Long story there...)


As a long time single dad with two kids, I have to tell you the dirty looks and snide remarks I got from the mini-van soccer moms for years was unbearable.  Just because I have dick and balls they assumed I had no business being around or children, or that I was “babysitting” my own kids, while their mother was elsewhere.  Complete strangers would approach me at the grocery to let me know “you’re doing it wrong.”

Now, I lived in a ground zero baby boom suburb, so there were lots of young mothers who were very proud of the fact they squeezed out a few kids.  Never mind everyone has a mother who squeezed them out, since the birth of mankind.

But emboldened by their procreative success, and determined to Baby Einstein their kids into Harvard, they were not the least bit shy about having opinions, or sharing them with others.  It’s amazing somebody’s tits didn’t get slapped.  Not that I would enjoy slapping some young lactating milk bags at the local grocer...
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« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2020, 02:32:38 AM »

I wouldn't quite call it irrational. Exaggerated, maybe, at most, but certainly not irrational. Reading that line immediately made me think of the disappearance of the Beaumont children, and many other cases since.

I'm a few years behind you but my childhood was similar to yours in terms of parental supervision and I don't remember any of my friends at the time being overly restricted by any parents. If my parents were more aware of the dangers strangers pose to kids than their parents were that would be entirely rational and only a good thing, given that their generation were the generation most preyed on by paedophiles within and without the Catholic Church in my country. To view those times as halcyon days requires heavily rose tinted glasses.
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