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Offline Pornhubby

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Reply #2265 on: July 02, 2022, 05:42:41 AM
“I’ve Been Waiting” by Foreigner.  Not on my playlist, but Amazon Music is constantly culling through my songs. So sweet with my third EW.



Offline Hilda

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Reply #2266 on: July 02, 2022, 05:57:03 AM
“I’ve Been Waiting” by Foreigner.  Not on my playlist, but Amazon Music is constantly culling through my songs. So sweet with my third EW.

I saw the band once in a large venue not known for its acoustics. When they launched into their set, my first thought was that they were miming to a recording, the sound was that good. But no, it soon became clear they were playing live.

Foreigner is one of the few bands in my "As Good Live as on Their Albums" list. You have great taste in music, PornHubby.  :emot_kiss:

You are just a thought that someone, somewhere, somehow feels you should be here.


Offline Pornhubby

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Reply #2267 on: July 02, 2022, 06:06:15 AM
They did “Cold as Ice,” which is basically my life story. LOL.

Listening to “Keep on Loving  You“ by REO Speedwagon.



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Reply #2268 on: July 02, 2022, 06:37:14 AM
The Georgia Satellites — Keep Your Hands to Yourself. (2019)

I have three GS albums in my collection, and this is a "Best Of" compilation. I don't know why I bother with compilations when I have the originals. Maybe it's just fun listening to familiar tracks in an unfamiliar order.

You are just a thought that someone, somewhere, somehow feels you should be here.


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Reply #2269 on: July 02, 2022, 04:07:45 PM

This song is about a real woman. Lola Montez was actually a former German Countess, when her husband died they kicked her to the curb, where she followed her long dormant passion of dancing. She came to America, and was a burlesque/ early version of a stripper, but also classically trained ballerina. But once she grew either too old or too tired of it, she became a professor in new york, and was an outspoken feminist. Sadly she died when she was 43 of Pneumonia. The Henry spoken of in the song was her biggest Moral critic, citing she was bad for public morality. The line about where she never read a word he printed was true. She did not let his words get her down. If time travel was a thing, I probably would spend my friday nights watching her dance.

« Last Edit: July 02, 2022, 04:16:55 PM by Writers Bloque »

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Reply #2270 on: July 02, 2022, 05:01:13 PM
Woo WB. Thanks for sharing.

Eliza Rosanna Gilbert, Countess of Landsfeld (17 February 1821 – 17 January 1861), better known by the stage name Lola Montez, was an Irish dancer and actress who became famous as a Spanish dancer, courtesan, and mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who made her Gräfin von Landsfeld (Countess of Landsfeld). At the start of the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states, she was forced to flee. She proceeded to the United States via Austria, Switzerland, France and London, returning to her work as an entertainer and lecturer.



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Reply #2271 on: July 02, 2022, 06:39:51 PM
Woo WB. Thanks for sharing.

Eliza Rosanna Gilbert, Countess of Landsfeld (17 February 1821 – 17 January 1861), better known by the stage name Lola Montez, was an Irish dancer and actress who became famous as a Spanish dancer, courtesan, and mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who made her Gräfin von Landsfeld (Countess of Landsfeld). At the start of the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states, she was forced to flee. She proceeded to the United States via Austria, Switzerland, France and London, returning to her work as an entertainer and lecturer.

There is the clarification I needed, the book I read on her did not go into such deep detail. Now I know more! Woo!

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Reply #2272 on: July 03, 2022, 03:41:38 AM
Clair de lune, Suite bergamasque, L. 75: III. Clair de lune  - song by Claude Debussy,



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Reply #2273 on: July 03, 2022, 04:28:08 AM
Shake You Down - Gregory Abbott (not the governor of Texas)



Offline Hilda

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Reply #2274 on: July 03, 2022, 04:49:41 AM
Shake You Down - Gregory Abbott (not the governor of Texas)

I'm not familiar with the artist but have seen the politician in news articles.

I'm wondering if there's any law about using another band or artist's name. I came across a UK studio band called "Misty" and tried to find some of their material on Apple Music. What I found was five or six artists/bands of that name, all Korean.

And talking of Korea, there was a great UK band called bôa, featuring a couple of Paul Rodgers' kids. That name, too, was taken by a Korean artist who called herself Boa.

Another mystery is Pam Todd and the Love Exchange. A SF band with a female power-vocalist. A decade later a disco group appeared with the name of Pam Todd and Love Exchange.

You are just a thought that someone, somewhere, somehow feels you should be here.


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Reply #2275 on: July 05, 2022, 04:10:28 AM
==>  Bach's Brandenburg Concertos - Academy of Ancient Music (dir. Christopher Hogwood)

I have a few versions of the Brandenburgs, but this one is a little different. It's performed on period instruments, and presumably sounds as Bach might have intended.

The texture of the sound is different, with some instruments standing out far more than in modern interpretations.

 

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Reply #2276 on: July 14, 2022, 02:51:34 AM
==> Buckethead's Arboretum (Pike No. 315)

Last week I purchased the album through Bandcamp, along with Dreams Remembered (No. 319)

I can't stand Buckethead's heavy-metal shredding, but I'm a sucker for his mellow recordings. I'm amazed that the two extremes can flow from the same brain.

You are just a thought that someone, somewhere, somehow feels you should be here.


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Reply #2277 on: July 17, 2022, 04:11:17 AM
==> Summer Solstice by Tim Hart and Maddy Prior (1971)

I'm a great fan of Maddy Prior and have most of her albums, including those she made with Steeleye Span. The Summer Solstice album was something of a discovery.

Track 9 in the album caught my eye. It's titled "Fly Up My Cock". Maddy sings it a cappella and it's about a cock who crows one hour too early and wakes up the singer. She finds her intended dressing for a long journey, with no prospect of an early return.

Very folksy, but I can't unthink the first thing that came to mind when I saw "Fly Up My Cock".  :facepalm:

You are just a thought that someone, somewhere, somehow feels you should be here.


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Reply #2278 on: July 17, 2022, 01:08:23 PM
==> Summer Solstice by Tim Hart and Maddy Prior (1971)

I'm a great fan of Maddy Prior and have most of her albums, including those she made with Steeleye Span. The Summer Solstice album was something of a discovery.

Track 9 in the album caught my eye. It's titled "Fly Up My Cock". Maddy sings it a cappella and it's about a cock who crows one hour too early and wakes up the singer. She finds her intended dressing for a long journey, with no prospect of an early return.

Very folksy, but I can't unthink the first thing that came to mind when I saw "Fly Up My Cock".  :facepalm:

Someone will ask this to be moved to the Sounding thread  ;D

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Reply #2279 on: July 24, 2022, 11:59:15 PM
The Story Behind The Song: Sultans Of Swing by Dire Straits
By Rob Hughes ( Classic Rock ) published February 13, 2019

Sultans Of Swing by Dire Straits was inspired by watching a hopeless jazz combo in a deserted pub, and set the band on the way from dire straits to superstardom

Just after 6pm on July 13, 1985, Dire Straits took to the stage at Wembley Stadium as part of Live Aid, playing to a global TV audience that reached a mind-frying 1.9 billion. In their slot between U2 and Queen, they started with Money For Nothing (joined by Sting), and then came an epic version of the song that made them superstars: Sultans Of Swing.

“It was a very special feeling to be part of something so unique,” recalls bassist John Illsley. “Live Aid was a unique privilege for all of us. It’s become a fabulous memory.”

Dire Straits’ standing as MTV megalords belied the absurdly humble origins of Sultans Of Swing. Singer/guitarist Mark Knopfler had written it in 1977, after ducking into a deserted pub one rainy night and witnessing a lousy jazz band. Undeterred by the lack of both talent and punters, their lead singer finished the set with a mildly enthusiastic, “Goodnight and thank you. We are the Sultans Of Swing.”

Knopfler at least left the pub with the seed of an idea. Returning home to the Deptford council flat he shared with his younger brother David and Illsley, he set about writing a song for the new band they’d just formed.

“We were living on next to nothing and weren’t even able to pay the gas bill,” Illsley says, adding that they weren’t called Dire Straits for nothing. “The first time I heard Mark playing a version of Sultans Of Swing was in that flat, but the song was completely different.”

Even Knopfler thought it lacked spark. But the song took on a smouldering blues groove after he scrabbled enough money together to buy a 1961 Stratocaster.

Illsley recalls: “One day he said to me: ‘Remember that song I was fiddling about with the other day? I’ve completely redone the chord structure.’ He played it, and it sounded pretty good. The whole thing is incredibly simple, it’s the playing that makes it intriguing. It’s that rolling rhythm on the guitar and a very simple bass and drums approach. Then, of course, it’s a story. And let’s face it, all good songs have a story.”

Sultans Of Swing sees Knopfler folding the night’s events into the narrative. As the rain beats down outside, the band are blowin’ Dixieland. Harry’s got a day job, but he’s up there giving it his all. So is Guitar George, who knows all the chords: ‘But it’s strictly rhythm/He doesn’t want to make it cry or sing/If any old guitar is all he can afford/When he gets up under the lights to play his thing.’ Meanwhile, a small group of youths are fooling around in the corner, ‘drunk and dressed in their best brown baggies and their platform soles/They don’t give a damn about any trumpet-playing band/It ain’t what they call rock and roll.’ It’s as damp an evocation of thankless 70s publand as you’re likely to hear.

“The whole thing is incredibly simple; it’s the playing that makes it intriguing. Then it’s a story. And all good songs have a story.”

John Illsley, still desperately seeking a record deal, in July ’77 Dire Straits booked time at a tiny eight-track studio. They then took the resulting five- song demo, which included Sultans Of Swing, to Radio London DJ Charlie Gillett. “Charlie went absolutely crazy about it,” Illsley remembers. “On air he said: ‘I’m going to play this until somebody picks this band up,’ which I thought was quite a bold thing to do. And thankfully they did. In those days one person at a radio station could really make a difference.”

Now that Sultans Of Swing was on constant rotation, record companies started to take note of this rumbling blues- rock tune about a rotten jazz band. Within two months Dire Straits had been signed by Phonogram. They were then put into Basing Street Studios to record their debut album, under the auspices of producer Muff Winwood and engineer Rhett Davies. But, as Illsley explains, “the problem we had was that we couldn’t get Sultans Of Swing to sound as good as the demo. There was even a time when the demo was being considered as the one that was going to go out as a single.” Eventually, though, they re-recorded it to everyone’s approval.

Released in May ’78, Sultans Of Swing didn’t create much of a stir in Britain. Then things started to move with an almost haphazard momentum. The self-titled album came out in October. Sales ticked very slowly, though it quickly went gold in Holland. “I got this phone call from the record company saying that we’d sold 25,000 albums,” Illsley remembers. “Then it went to the States and took off there. The radio stations started playing Sultans Of Swing like crazy. And because America picked up on it, it came back to the UK and got re-released again, which was really peculiar. It started spreading like wildfire.”

By early ’79, the single had gone Top 10 on both sides of the Atlantic, as had the album, whose unfussy aesthetic and timeless songcraft, allied to a frontman who sounded like the stop-off point between JJ Cale and Bob Dylan, led to sales of more than seven million. Suddenly Knopfler was being toasted as the greatest home-grown guitarist since Eric Clapton. And even Dylan came calling, enlisting Knopfler and Dire Straits drummer Pick Withers to play on Slow Train Coming.

Dire Straits, of course, went on to become one of the most successful British bands of the 80s. By the time they hung up their guitar straps in 1992, they’d racked up sales of more than 120 million and littered their mantelpiece with Grammys and Brits.

“I suppose you could say that Sultans Of Swing was the one song that started it all off,” muses Illsley. “It had a huge impact. These are the catalysts that move you onward through life. People have said we were lucky, but I say: ‘Well, what does luck mean?’ The fact of the matter is that it was a bloody good song, the band was pretty damn good and we worked bloody hard. And the only way you’re going to get anywhere is by being committed. So if something like that happens to you, it’s fantastic. Boy, was it exciting!”